15 Small Orange Birds You Should Know

If you spotted a colorful orange bird in your backyard, this collection of beautiful bird pictures shared by readers can help you identify it.

Oriole On The Crab Apple Tree;my Backyard!!
Courtesy Tim White

Baltimore Oriole

Orioles are some of the most commonly known orange bird species. Birds & Blooms reader Tim White shared this photo of a Baltimore oriole on the crabapple tree in his backyard. Discover 25 small yellow birds birders should know.

blackburnian warbler
Courtesy Cam Kline

Blackburnian Warbler

“The Blackburnian warbler is in my opinion one of the most beautiful warblers. I feel like this picture captures the beauty of the bird, and it is one of my favorite pictures I have ever had the pleasure taking,” says Cam Kline.

247768931 1 Della Alcorn Bnbhc20
Courtesy Della Alcorn

Rufous Hummingbird

“What makes the rufous hummingbird so special to me is that although he’s small, he’s mighty. He guards his feeding area with a passion. This little rufous took up residence on our patio in March 2020 and hung around and entertained us for several weeks. We loved watching his aerial acrobatics while he defended his turf!”

eastern towhee
Courtesy Michele Lam

Eastern Towhee

“I chose to enter this photo of an Eastern towhee in the contest because I liked the way the early morning light brought out his striking red eyes. Catching a shot of this fellow perched on a branch singing away was a real thrill for me. Usually I’m only lucky enough to hear the towhees rustling through the leaf litter. It was taken on a hike through the woods behind our home in Rockbridge County, Virginia, in mid-April of this year,” says Michele Lam.

birds that eat oranges, fruit bird feeders
Courtesy Karen Osadchey

Bullock’s Oriole

Bullock’s orioles come to our home to build nests and enjoy endless supply of oranges every summer. They are the most colorful bird we get to see here in eastern Idaho and photograph perfectly,” says Karen Osadchey.

robin bird meaning
Courtesy Dorrie Milan

American Robin

“In Michigan, we waited with baited breath in late winter/early spring for our little American robin friends to show up. They usher in a feeling up optimism and confidence that summer is just around the corner,” says Dorrie Milan. If you love these orange bird photos, enjoy 15 cheerful robin bird pictures.

250968555 1 Martin Torres Bnb Bypc2020

American Redstart

This little American redstart actually followed me through the woods with a curious attitude. Sure he was scolding me too and showing off by fanning his tail and wings. This was on a beautiful spring morning in my backyard in Michigan,” says Martin Torres.

orange birds
Courtesy Diane Fiedler

Black-Headed Grosbeak

“This black-headed grosbeak landed on my deck in Evergreen, Colorado. I had to crack my sliding door slowly so the grosbeak wouldn’t fly away when I stuck my lens around the glass,” says Diane Fiedler.

250483772 1 Michael Demoss Bnb Bypc2020
Courtesy Michael Demoss

Orchard Oriole

“We rarely see orchard orioles in our backyard, but we can always see them throughout the month of April at our local lake in Northeast Texas. They are one of my favorite spring birds,” says Michael Demoss.

A varied thrush perches on a branch in winter.
Courtesy Nevin Hayter

Varied Thrush

“I was overly happy when I spotted a varied thrush in my yard, and he waited for me to get my camera. Such beautiful and subtle coloration,” says Nevin Hayter.

orange birds
Courtesy Lindsey MacFarlane

American Avocet

“I am ever so thankful to live in the northwest corner of Montana. I was able to focus on this adult American avocet for several shots while it was busy gracefully swishing its buffy orange head side to side looking for lunch. Most birds seem to be way out of reach or moving so fast that it makes it hard to capture their beauty with a camera. It was a treat to watch this beautiful orange bird on an early summer morning,” says Lindsey Macfarlane.

orange birds
Courtesy Francee Strain

Say’s Phoebe

This photo of a Say’s phoebe was taken in my yard in Spokane, Washington. This gray and orange bird does not sit still for long. It will quickly perch, look around, and then fly off to snag an insect out of the air,” says Francee Strain. Don’t miss 20 photos of breathtaking blue colored birds.

252770407 1 Gary Mcmillan Bnb Bypc2020
Courtesy Gary Mcmillan

Spotted Towhee

“This is a spring photo of a spotted towhee on the blackberry vines in my yard. I like how the towhee’s eyes pop with their vibrant orange color and texture added by the thorny vine,” says Gary Mcmillan. Discover 8 yellow and black birds you should look for.

253926957 1 Alan Hailston Bnb Bypc2020

Hooded Oriole

“It was a 2-in-1 good luck shot when I captured this pair of male and female hooded orioles in their wintering range of Mexico while I was vacationing in Cancun. Only nature itself could offer such beautiful orange bird color,” says Alan Hailston. Learn how to attract orioles to your backyard.

barn swalllow
Courtesy Erin Brady

Barn Swallow

“I photographed this barn swallow while walking around Legion Lake in Custer State Park in late June. I spend a lot of time in South Dakota during the summer every year, and I always see a lot of barn swallows. I think their complementary colors of blue and orange are so beautiful. I love the background of this photo as well because the pine cones and pine needles set the perfect mountain scene,” says Erin Brady.

Lori Vanover
Lori has 20 years of experience writing and editing home, garden, birding and lifestyle content for several publishers. As Birds & Blooms senior digital editor, she leads a team of writers and editors sharing birding tips and expert gardening advice. Since joining Trusted Media Brands 13 years ago, she has held roles in digital and print, editing magazines and books, curating special interest publications, managing social media accounts, creating digital content and newsletters, and working with the Field Editors—Birds & Blooms network of more than 50 backyard birders. Passionate about animals and nature, Lori has a Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural and Environmental Communications from the University of Illinois. In 2023, she became certified as a Wisconsin Extension Master Gardener, and she is a member of the Wisconsin Society for Ornithology and sits on the organization's Publications Advisory Committee. She frequently checks on her bird feeders while working from home and tests new varieties of perennials, herbs and vegetable plants in her ever-growing backyard gardens.