Top 10 Pretty Peach Colored Flowers to Grow

Make your garden pretty in peach! Add peach colored flowers to your garden beds in honor of the 2024 Pantone Color of the Year.

Warm, nurturing, and loveable, “Peach Fuzz,” Pantone’s 2024 Color of the Year, is as welcome as a good friend’s hug. Here you’ll find some of the prettiest choices to bring peach colored flowers into your gardens.

310004249 1 Jennifer Sigmon Bnb Bypc22
Courtesy Jennifer Sigmon
Peach colored poppy flowers

Each year, Pantone’s color experts scan global influences to select the color we crave. This year, it’s the glow of warm, enveloping peach. Pantone says, “Peach Fuzz captures our desire to nurture ourselves and others. It’s a velvety gentle peach tone whose all-embracing spirit enriches mind, body, and soul.” There are so many ways to use this soothing and versatile color in your plantings. In the garden, peach colored flowers glow with soft light—and even after dark in moon gardens.

Hovering in the space between the palest orange and yellow, peach looks ethereal with other light shades, like white, lime green and lemon yellow. Or for a little more drama, you can turn up the heat. Like the fruit it’s named for, peach sings with reds and yellows, and sparkles against color complements. Blues, purples, and burgundies create exciting contrasts. Dark foliage and flowers look especially striking with peach. Pair peach plants with viva magenta, the 2023 Color of the Year, to conjure a tropical vibe.

BEGONIA 'FRAGRANT FALLS PEACH'
© GWI/Oscar D’arcy/agefotostock

Fragrant Falls Begonia

Begonia ‘Fragrant Falls Peach’, Zones 8a-11b or annual

A beacon of warm light in the shade, 10-inch tall Begonia ‘Fragrant Falls’ is perfect as a “spiller” in containers or hanging baskets or even lining garden border edges en masse.

Why we love it: We’d plant it for that yummy mango color alone. But when you add the dimension of sweet fragrance, it’s a slam dunk.

 DAHLIA – DAHLIGHTFUL® GEORGIA PEACH – DAHLIA VARIABILIS
Provenwinners.com

Dahlightful Georgia Peach Dahlia

Dahlia variabilis, Zones 8a-10b or annual

Topping out at 30 inches, this container-sized dahlia blooms early and long with sumptuous semi-double peach flowers marked by prominent yellow stamens.

Why we love it: With easy-to-reach stamens, bees, butterflies and other beneficial insects will flock to your dahlia.

christmas beauty cinnamon poinesettia
Ball Horticultural Company

Christmas Beauty Cinnamon Poinsettia

Euphorbia pulcherrima hybrid, Zones 9a-11b or annual

Adding soft elegance to your winter décor, Christmas Beauty Cinnamon’s peach bracts and lime buds glow against dark green leaves held high. (What look like poinsettia flower petals to most of us are botanically called bracts.)

Why we love it: Experts praise this cultivar’s vigor in warm and cool temperatures and long-lasting display appeal.

peach blossom astilbe
Walters Gardens, Inc.

Peach Blossom Astilbe

Astilbe arendsii ‘Peach Blossom’, Zones 4a-9b

Lighting up shady corners in soft flowers adding welcome vertical accents in the garden or pots, these easy-care plants bloom even in full shade with consistent watering.

Why we love it: While deer generally avoid astilbe, pollinators love them. These fluffy blooms will delight bees and butterflies in the height of summer.

Coreopsis verticillata Crème Caramel
Ball Horticultural Company

Crème Caramel Tickseed

Coreopsis verticillata hybrid, Zones 5a to 9b

Coreopsis are can-do plants—shrugging off both heat and occasional dry spells to bloom and bloom. This variety forms a mound of starry, yellow-eyed blossoms the color of ripe peaches with a hint of caramel sauce.

Why we love it: With a little deadheading, coreopsis plants happily pump out a nearly inexhaustible supply of flowers for months attracting bees and butterflies. Did we mention deer tend to pass them by?

Check out the top 10 flowering perennials that bloom all summer.

Achillea Firefly Peach Sky Apj20 2
provenwinners.com

Firefly Peach Sky Yarrow

Achillea hybrid ‘Firefly Peach Sky’, Zones 3a-8b

Like its fruit namesake, Firefly Peach Sky ignites summer borders. Warm shades range from melon to cherry as the flowers emerge and fade.

Why we love it: Not only are the flowers long-lasting, looking snappy even as they dry in the garden or as cut flowers. If pruned after blooming, you’ll enjoy an encore performance weeks later. They also appeal to an array of pollinators.

Echinacea Supreme Cantaloupe 1
Terra Nova Nurseries

SUPREME Cantaloupe Coneflower

Echinacea hybrida, Zones 4a to 9b

Party-ready, this distinctive coneflower comes with fun frills for days in a mouthwatering melon shade.

Why we love it: Supreme Cantaloupe delivers months of peach colored flowers for your garden and table. It needs less water than many perennials once established, and prefers lean soils. Skip the fertilizer, please!

Award-winning Cheyenne Spirit coneflower dazzles with color.

46234 Delosperma Alan S Apricot 4208mnc
Doreen Wynja/Monrovia

Alan’s Apricot Ice Plant

Delosperma ‘Alan’s Apricot’, Zones 4a-10b

Ice plants’ beautiful flowers mask their tough constitutions. These succulents like high elevations and gritty soils. Alan’s Apricot is also a Plant Select Winner.

Why we love it: Groundcovers save water and weeding time. This one is water wise, evergreen, and covered in charming apricot flowers from late spring through summer.

ROSA – OSO EASY® PEACHY CREAM
Provenwinners.com

Oso Easy Peachy Cream Rose

Rosa hybrida, Zones 4a to 9b

Find a spot front and center for this compact rose’s dreamy peach colored flowers, which need minimal care. Reaching a manageable 12 to 36 inches high and up to 48 inches wide, the glossy foliage sets off the blooms beautifully.

Why we love it: Promising excellent disease resistance, it repeats bloom without needing pruning or spraying, making it a standout solo or in a chorus line on a hillside.

Try the top 10 fragrant roses to perfume your garden.

Pae Oompa Loompa 0002
Plants Nouveau / Monrovia

Garden Candy Oompa Loompa Itoh Peony

Paeonia (Intersectional hybrid) x ‘Smithopus5’ PPAF, Zones 4a to 9b

A mix between traditional and tree peonies, Itoh peonies do lose their leaves, but boast high flower power without staking. The lush double apricot petals pop against golden stamens ringed in dark pink.

Why we love it: Compact and rounded at 3 feet tall by 3 feet wide, Garden Candy makes a sweet bowl of both mildew- and deer-resistant flowers. It lives happily in even tough soils like streetside plantings.

Don’t miss the ultimate guide to peony flower care.

SuperTrouper™ Orange Dianthus
Ball Horticultural Company
SuperTrouper Orange Dianthus

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Sources:

Erica Browne Grivas
A longtime journalist and avid gardener, Erica Browne Grivas' writing explores the interplay of humans and nature. In addition to Birds & Blooms, she writes for publications like the Seattle Times, Horticulture, GardenRant, Pacific Horticulture and Digger Magazine, as well as contributing two columns for local Washington newspapers on gardening and health and wellness. She is a content consultant for Pacific Horticulture, aiding with website language, overall content, and video production. Garden Communicators International has awarded her both Silver and Gold medals of excellence for her garden features and columns. She has studied landscape design, worked in nurseries on two coasts, and represented garden media nationally as a director of Garden Communicators International. Before turning her attention to gardening, she started in journalism writing for the New York Post and then in television production at "Inside Edition." She loves sharing accurate, inspiring information to help people experience the joy of engaging with nature.