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Top 10 Pink and Orange Flowers That Look Just Like a Sunset

Plant these stunning, sunset-colored blooms to create a wow factor in your garden.

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Superbells Tropical Sunrise calibrachoaCourtesy of Proven Winners – www.provenwinners.com

Superbells Tropical Sunrise Calibrachoa

Calibrachoa, annual

Growing 6 to 12 inches tall, Tropical Sunrise has a trailing habit that makes it ideal for filling in pots, window boxes or hanging baskets. Streaks of yellow, pink and red on each flower mean this hummingbird favorite can be planted alone or be paired with similar hues.

Why we love it: Some of its many perks include gorgeous color and continuous blooms that last into fall. Plus there’s no need to deadhead—a gardener’s dream! Check out more long-blooming flowers that attract hummingbirds.

Where to buy it: Home Depot

Cabana Banana dahliaagefotostock/Alamy Stock Photo

Cabana Banana Dahlia

Dahlia, Zones 3 to 10

This 4-foot-tall dahlia has exquisite quill-shaped petals in a beautiful pink-tinged cream hue. The large blooms attract butterflies and hummingbirds and grow even bigger if excess buds are removed. If you live in Zones 3 to 8, dig up the tuberous roots in fall and overwinter.

Why we love it: It is easy to grow, blooms from summer to frost and has lightly fragrant flowers that work well in arrangements.

Where to buy it: Dahlias.com

Lucky Peach lantanaVia Ball Horticultural Company

Lucky Peach Lantana

Lantana Camara, Zones 10 to 12, annual elsewhere

Lucky Peach lantana attracts butterflies and hummingbirds but not deer. And with beautiful peach blooms, it’s bound to attract lots of people, too! Growing just 12 to 16 inches tall, it has a compact mounded shape ideal for containers. Grow it as a perennial in warm climates or as an annual elsewhere.

Why we love it: Typical of lantana, it loves sun and stands up well to heat and humidity.

Where to buy it: Plants By Mail

Butterfly Rainbow Marcella coneflowerVia Bluestone Perennials

Butterfly Rainbow Marcella Coneflower

Echinacea, Zones 4 to 9

Butterfly Rainbow Marcella makes choosing a coneflower variety easy with bicolor raspberry pink flowers that melt into orange and yellow hues—the blooms look as if they’re glowing. It grows just 15 to 18 inches tall, so it doesn’t need staking.

Why we love it: It’s an easy-care butterfly favorite for hot, sunny conditions. Coneflowers also attract birds and butterflies.

Where to buy it: Bluestone Perennials

Tahitian Sunset roseBotanic World/Alamy Stock Photo

Tahitian Sunset Rose

Rosa, Zones 6 to 9

This award-winning rose features licorice-scented, multicolored blooms in a mix of yellow, apricot and pink that become more intensely colored in the sun. Keep deadheading for flowers all summer long. Tahitian Sunset grows up to 5 feet tall and 3 to 4 feet wide. Check out more fragrant roses to perfume your garden.

Why we love it: It’s a hybrid tea rose with lush, healthy foliage and good blackspot resistance.

Where to buy it: Heirloom Roses

Peachie Keen anise hyssopWalters Gardens, Inc.

Peachie Keen Anise Hyssop

Agastache, Zones 6 to 9

Be keen in the garden and kind to pollinators. This brightly hued bloomer accomplishes both. It’s loaded with apricot-peach flowers paired with purplish pink calyx—magnets for hummingbirds, bees and butterflies. This perennial is 2 feet tall and is often grown as an annual in colder climates.

Why we love it: Peachie Keen has a more refined shape than other types of agastache. Here’s even more summer nectar flowers that attract butterflies.

Where to buy it: Walters Gardens

Calibrachoa 'Callie Orange SunriseVia Michler's

Callie Orange Sunrise Calibrachoa

Calibrachoa, annual

Growing just 4 to 8 inches tall, this Callie’s trailing habit makes it versatile enough to edge a border, fill in a container or star in a hanging basket. For subtle color variations, mix this heat tolerant flower with other Callie calibrachoas in complementary orange and apricot hues.

Why we love it: From spring to fall, this orange stunner adds welcome pops of color to sunny spots. Discover more easy plants you can grow in containers.

Where to buy it: Michler’s

Totally Tangerine avensGraham Titchmarsh/Alamy Stock Photo

Totally Tangerine Avens

Geum, Zones 4 to 7

Avens, also known as geum, is a gem that deserves more attention—and Totally Tangerine knows how to attract it. Orange-peach flowers rise above mounded foliage from late spring through midsummer. Cool weather and deadheading improve flowering.

Why we love it: It’s one of the largest geums and takes anything from full sun to part shade.

Where to buy it: Bluestone Perennials

begonia fragrant falls peachVia White Flower Farm

Fragrant Falls Peach Begonia

Begonia, annual

The roselike blooms of Fragrant Falls Peach begonia are impressive and highly fragrant, and they sport a beautiful yellowish peach hue. This begonia grows 8 to 12 inches tall with a slightly trailing habit, so it’s perfect for containers, hanging baskets, or where aesthetic and aromatic charm are needed.

Why we love it: It grows in shade and dons handsome foliage.

Where to buy: White Flower Farm

Tequila Sunrise columbineMatthew Taylor/Alamy Stock Photo

Tequila Sunrise Columbine

Aquilegia skinneri, Zones 5 to 8

With bright copper red, orange and yellow hues, this columbine looks like a meteor streaking across the early morning sky. Plenty of blooms emerge in midspring, and Tequila Sunrise keeps blooming well into summer. It grows 28 inches tall and is loved by pollinators.

Why we love it: Hummingbirds appreciate the blooms while deer and rabbits tend to leave the plant alone.

Where to buy it: Bluestone Perennials

Luke Miller
Luke Miller is an award-winning garden editor with 25 years' experience in horticultural communications, including editing a national magazine and creating print and online gardening content for a national retailer. He grew up across the street from a park arboretum and has a lifelong passion for gardening in general and trees in particular. In addition to his journalism degree, he has studied horticulture and is a Master Gardener.