Ron Pittaway’s Finch Irruption Forecast

How one ornithologist predicts winter finch irruptions and what you can expect to see this winter.

Most winters, birders in the United States can expect to see the typical feathered visitors: northern cardinals, chickadees, blue jays, titmice, woodpeckers, etc. But occasionally, a sudden surge of unexpected birds can wander outside their typical winter range and migrate further south than they normally would. This is called an irruption. Irruptions can be difficult to predict ahead of time and the reasons behind these surprising, sporadic migrations isn’t straightforward. (Researchers have found the causes vary from species to species.)

Ornithologist Ron Pittaway predicts the irruptions of winter finches by analyzing the status of wild food crops such as spruce cones and mountain ash berries in Canada. He’s been doing his Winter Finch Forecast since 2012. In a nutshell, Ron’s forecast is based on whether or not there is enough food to feed the hungry finches in the forests of Ontario. If there hasn’t been enough, he’ll predict an irruption of birds that will venture down into the United States to fill their bellies.

The 2019 Winter Finch Forecast

For 2019, Ron’s forecast does not point to this being an irruption year and the majority of winter finches will stay up north. Ron says, “This is not an irruption (flight) year for winter finches in the East. Most winter finches will stay in the north. There are abundant spruce cone crops across the boreal forest in Ontario, Quebec, and Newfoundland. Most conifers (except pines), birches and other seed crops are good to excellent in much of the Northeast. This should be a good winter to see finches in traditional hotspots such as Ontario’s Algonquin Park, Quebec’s Laurentian Mountains, New York’s Adirondack Mountains, and northern New England States.”

Although Ron always makes it clear that these are just predictions, plenty of birders rely on his forecast to get a more accurate sense of what to expect to see in winter.

Read the full Winter Finch Forecast here!