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11 Wooden Bird Feeders That Will Attract a Flock

No matter what kind of songbirds you want to feed and attract, we found wooden bird feeders that are perfect for your backyard.

Every editorial product is independently selected, though we may be compensated or receive an affiliate commission if you buy something through our links. Ratings and prices are accurate and items are in stock as of time of publication.

05 Feeder2 Bbdj23Via Merchant

Side Mount Platform Feeder

Large platform feeders attract bigger songbirds like grosbeaks and ground feeding birds like mourning doves. Securely mount these handmade wooden bird feeders to your deck or fence with screws. A mesh screen bottom allows rainwater to drain out.

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Check out 9 gorgeous glass bird feeders for your yard.

best selling bird feedersVia Merchant

Deluxe Cedar Hopper and Suet Feeder

Offer birds a buffet in your yard with this wood seed and suet feeder. It holds two suet cakes and birds can eat seed from the tray on both sides.

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We found more of the best suet feeders for winter birds.

double suet feederVia Merchant

Cedar Hanging Suet Feeder

Larger red-bellied and pileated woodpeckers will appreciate the long tail prop on this cedar hanging suet feeder.

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Don’t miss our picks for the best bird feeders to attract woodpeckers.

Hanging Bird Feeder Tray Ecomm Via Etsy.comvia merchant

Hanging Wooden Tray Bird Feeders

This wooden tray feeder is open on all sides and can hold up to 4 pounds of seed. Birds that don’t typically visit feeding stations, like dark-eyed juncos, might stop by for a quick seed snack.

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starling proof suet feederVia Merchant

Upside-Down Suet Feeder

If bully birds are taking over your feeders, try this upside-down suet feeder. Acrobatic nuthatches will have no trouble accessing the suet but starlings will go elsewhere for an easy meal.

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porch swing wooden bird feederVia Merchant

Porch Swing Feeder

We love this adorable porch swing feeder. It is sure to stand out as a bright spot in your yard and attract your favorite songbirds. You can choose from 8 different colors and personalize the text.

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Squirrels stealing all of the birdseed? Try a squirrel-proof bird feeder!

Etsy Tree FeederVia Merchant

Wooden Tree Bird Feeders

This wooden bird feeder is truly a piece of art! We love the elegant tree branches and tiny bird carved into the design. Fill the tray at the bottom with any type of birdseed—we especially recommend black oil sunflower seeds and safflower seeds.

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mason jar wooden bird feederVia Merchant

Mason Jar Bird Feeder

How cute is this rustic wooden bird feeder! Simply fill up the mason jar with bird seed and wait for your feathered friends to fly over for a meal. Choose from brown, blue or barn red.

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We found platform bird feeders your birds will love.

log seed winter bird feederVia merchant

Log Seed Feeder

For a truly unique gift for your birdies, try this log bird feeder carved out of cherry wood. Simply pour bird seed into the middle and hang it up. You could also smear peanut butter or spreadable suet on the bark. The seller also offers feeders made with walnut logs.

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Try window bird feeders to give you closer views of birds.

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Songbird Platform Bird Feeder

Give your small songbirds a safe space with a caged bird feeder. Pigeons, grackles and blackbirds won’t be able to get inside but finches and chickadees will have no problems. Note that the cage is not removable; the manufacturer recommends cleaning the feeder with a high-pressure hose.

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wooden oriole feederVia Merchant

Wooden Oriole Bird Feeders

Want to attract orioles? Try this pine wood oriole feeder. It includes a removable cup for grape jelly and two pegs for oranges. You could also fill the cup with mealworms for bluebirds.

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Next, check out the best cardinal bird feeders and birdseed.

Lori Vanover
Lori Vanover is the senior digital editor for Birds & Blooms. She has a bachelor's degree in agricultural and environmental communications from the University of Illinois. Lori enjoys growing vegetables and flowers for pollinators in her gardens. She is also a member of the Wisconsin Society for Ornithology.