16 Delightful Pictures of Wren Birds

Birders love a good picture of a wren, and we've rounded up 16 of them! See wrens building nests in unusual places, feeding babies and more.

wren on iris flower
Courtesy Deborah Bryk

Pictures of Wrens

Nothing says summer quite like the bubbly chirping of wrens. Sure, the little brown birds don’t have much in the way of flashy plumage (you won’t mistake theirs for shimmery hummingbird feathers). But they make up for it with their spunky personalities… and their affinity for nesting in pretty much anything they can find. If you love looking at wrens in your yard, you’ll love looking at a picture of a wren, too — and we’ve rounded up 15 of them from Birds & Blooms readers!

250408271 1 Louis Ruttkay Bnb Bypc2020, picture of a wren
Courtesy Louis Ruttkay

Singing Carolina Wren

“Carolina crooner! The loud song of this species is unmistakable, and that’s what drew me to this Carolina wren. This photo was taken in my backyard. I crept up slowly and positioned myself behind a pine tree, hoping I didn’t disturb it. As it perched in a dogwood tree, crooning loudly, I was able to get some images I was happy with. Overall mood, setting, singing subject and bokeh is what I enjoy about this image,” Louis Ruttkay says.

250515607 1 Claudia Garner Bnb Bypc2020
Courtesy Claudia Garner

A Bug for Breakfast

“This house wren and its mate decided to nest this spring in a small, made-for-decoration house hanging in my backyard. There they incubated, fed and fledged two busy youngsters. I took this while having a cup of coffee one morning,” Claudia Garner says. Missing your backyard crooners? Here’s when house wrens return in the spring.

251850497 1 Colleen Wagner Bnb Bypc2020, picture of a wren
Courtesy Colleen Wagner

House Wren at Home

“This is a picture of a wren. Every spring, my grandsons love to watch for it to come back and build its nest in the house on my deck. They recognize its singing, but they also know when it is scolding at something,” Colleen Wagner says. Learn how to attract nesting Carolina and house wrens.

251912420 1 Barry Mackichan Bnb Bypc2020
Courtesy Barry Mackichan

Waiting for the Feeder

“In 2020, it was COVID-time photography in the backyard. This bird was waiting in line for a chance at the feeder when I took this picture of a Carolina wren. This was also the first appearance of the honeysuckle we planted in 2019,” Barry Mackichan says. Check out 9 easy tips for feeding birds in summer.

252639839 1 Barbara Anderson Bnb Bypc2020, picture of a wren
Courtesy Barbara Anderson

Wren Building a Nest

“It was the last day of spring when a bird decided to make this house its new home. All day long, I watched it slowly build a nest in front of our mountain home, stopping occasionally to sing out loud like it was making an announcement. The little bird deserves to be recognized for all of its hard work!” says Barbara Anderson. Check out our photo roundup of adorable baby wrens.

Bnbbyc16 Kathy Fritzges 002
Courtesy Kathy Fritzges

Picture of a Wren Getting a Snack

“During the winter months I always hang my homemade milk jug feeder underneath my back porch awning. I fill it with birdseed and peanuts, and it never fails to capture all the birds’ attentions. A Carolina wren was happy to find a peanut, and it stopped long enough for me to get this shot. I stayed hidden behind the curtains on my porch window so I was able to get up close,” Kathy Fritzges says.

Bnbbyc17 Benjamin Cash, picture of a wren
Courtesy Benjamin Cash

Carolina Wren Family

“I chose this picture because we sometimes forget just how important family is. This baby wren would not survive without mom and dad bringing food constantly. I watched these parents build their nest in this new house I installed at the end of winter, and I was shocked to see it filled with eggs in a matter of two months. Then, the baby bird was born. This experience was amazing to watch, and I was especially happy to capture the scene with a photograph,” Benjamin Cash says. Discover why the male house wren is one of the best bird dads.

Bnbbyc18 Norma Davis, picture of a wren
Courtesy Norma Davis

Unique Wren House

“A friend hung a pair of jeans on the clothesline to dry in July, and a wren built a nest in the pocket. I sat in her backyard and took pictures! This photo shows Daddy Wren feeding Mama a worm as she sits on the eggs in the nest,” Norma Davis says. Here’s how to choose a birdhouse for your favorite feathered fliers.

Bnbbyc18 Kevin Mccarthy
Courtesy Kevin Mccarthy

Carolina Wren in the Snow

“I have a bird feeder placed right outside a window. During a freak snowstorm in Charlotte, North Carolina, I sat patiently by the window to see which bird species might show up. This Carolina wren seemed totally confused by the unusual weather. I took this photo through the window,” Kevin Mccarthy says.

Bnbbyc19 Amy Harkness
Courtesy Amy Harkness

Cute House Wren in Summertime

“This photo was taken at our summer cottage. It is a house wren, and it took up residence in a hole in our garage wall a downy woodpecker created the year before. We enjoy listening to the wrens’ bubbling every summer,” Amy Harkness says. Don’t miss more stunning summer bird photos.

Bnbbyc19 Pamela Parker, picture of a wren
Courtesy Pamela Parker

A Holiday Cactus Wren

“I was walking down the wildflower trail at the Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, Arizona, when I spotted this cactus wren. It amazes me how these wrens do not get stuck by the needles of a cactus while they hop around inside. It was in November when I took this photo, and with the cactus surrounding the cactus wren, it reminds me of a Christmas wreath,” Pamela Parker says. Discover more desert birds of the southwest.

Bnbbyc19 Michelle Summers, picture of a wren
Courtesy Michelle Summers

An Unusual Home for Bewick’s Wrens

“This is a pair of Bewick’s wrens who used the open end of this post for their nest one year. The previous year, Carolina chickadees used this spot. I love the birds and put a good deal of effort into providing water, food and nesting facilities for them. Sometimes they choose things like a post in just the right spot over a cute little bird house, but that’s okay with me. It is always special to me to witness these tiny little families grow!” Michelle Summers says.

Bnbbyc19 Theresa Erbstein
Courtesy Theresa Erbstein

House Wren With Berries

“Each morning I walk a different preserve, natural land or park. Usually, my camera and my two dogs are with me. On this beautiful day in early October, I was at the arboretum. This is one of the few places no dogs are allowed, but it gives me more freedom. I like this photo of the house wren among the berries,” Theresa Erbstein says. Discover 7 backyard birds that eat berries.

Bnbbyc19 Janis Harless 1
Courtesy Janis Harless

Cactus Wren Strikes a Pose

“My husband and I traveled to Scottsdale, Arizona, in January to escape the cold weather in North Carolina. One morning after breakfast we went for a walk, and this little cactus wren landed on a rock only a few feet away from us. I was afraid he’d fly away when I got out my camera but he posed for several shots. The cactus wren is the state bird of Arizona,” Janis Harless says.

252849730 1 Sherry Schellengerparker Bnb Bypc2020, picture of a wren
Courtesy Sherry Schellengerparker

Breakfast Delivery

“I had just hung this birdhouse in my backyard one year and was blessed with two broods of wrens. I watched the frantic comings and goings of Mom and Dad to feed their babes for hours. Finally, I was able to capture a picture of a wren incoming. Not an easy task when you’re watching and waiting, and then they are so quick. I was delighted beyond measure when I clicked my camera and later saw I had captured the shot! I took this picture during a morning feeding,” Sherry Schellenger Parker says. You know that wrens use birdhouses… but what about hummingbirds?

Emily Hannemann
Emily Hannemann is an associate editor for Birds & Blooms digital. Throughout her years with the publication, she has written multiple articles for print as well as digital, all covering birding and gardening. In her role as associate editor, she is responsible for creating and editing articles on the subject of birding and gardening, as well as putting together Birds & Blooms daily digital newsletter. Graduating from the University of Missouri - Columbia with a master's degree in magazine journalism and undergraduate degrees in journalism and English, she has more than eight years of experience in the magazine, newspaper, and book industries.