8 Adorable Baby Wren Photos

Wrens are the too-cute birds with a big voice — and a baby wren is even cuter. Check out our photo roundup featuring the fluffy, tiny birds.

253814158 1 Renee Glass Bnb Bypc2020
Courtesy Renee Glass

Baby Wren Waiting for Food

“I was getting ready to do my morning chores when I spotted a wren family in a pile of branches in my yard. They were making a lot of noise, and this little baby wren was waiting for mom to bring him some more food,” Renee Glass says.

Want to see baby wrens in your yard? Here’s what wrens eat and how to attract them.

Bnbbyc17 Sandy Martin, baby wren
Courtesy Sandy Martin

A Spider Snack

“The house wrens used the hanging decoration on my front porch for a home. Enjoying having a close-up experience with mother nature, I watched them feed the babies. Mom has two spiders in her beak, one for each baby,” Sandy Martin says.

When do house wrens return in the spring?

Bnbbyc17 Benjamin Cash
Courtesy Benjamin Cash

The Importance of Family

“A baby Carolina wren would not survive without Mom and Dad bringing food constantly. I watched this Mom and Dad build their nest in this new house I installed at the end of winter. This experience was amazing to watch, and I was especially happy to capture the scene with a photograph,” Benjamin Cash says.

Here’s how to welcome nesting wrens to birdhouses.

Bnbbyc16 Jill Shelden 001
Courtesy Jill Shelden

House Wren Feeding Time

“This is a picture of house wrens that used the house on our front porch this summer. I waited patiently to get these pictures, and the wrens didn’t seem to mind. The babies have all left now, but I will be waiting for more opportunities next summer!” Jill Shelden says.

If you love photos of baby wrens, you’ll enjoy these delightful wren pictures.

Bnbugc Chris Hiller
Courtesy Chris Hiller

Baby Wren in Birdhouse

“Not long after I mounted a sturdy cedar birdhouse on a railing, a pair of house wrens showed up to raise a family. It was amazing to watch how much care the wrens put into feeding their hungry babies. Every morning, they brought grubs and caterpillars,” Chris Hiller says.

Learn how to identify a Bewick’s wren and a cactus wren.

Bnbbyc19 Kendall Johnson 1, baby wren
Courtesy Kendall Johnson

Three Little Wrens

“One winter, my grandfather gave me a birdhouse that he made. During the time it took to decide where I wanted to put the birdhouse, I put it off to the side in our gazebo and a wren decided to make a home there. Needless to say, we couldn’t move the birdhouse then,” Kendall Johnson says.

Find out what a Carolina wren’s call sounds like.

baby wren
Courtesy Heather Loewen / Our Canada

Feed Me!

“Each summer we put out several birdhouses and feeders. This summer we were thrilled when a pair of wrens decided on this house. We spent lots of time watching the parents feeding and taking care of their young. The parents were kept very busy supplying food as the young got older. Just a day or two after this picture was taken the young left the nest,” says Heather Loewen.

Sharon Turner May 2022 Carolina Wren
Courtesy Sharon Turner

Time to Fly

“Our resident Carolina wrens — Mom is cleaning house. Time to fly, baby! The camper is too small!” Sharon Turner says.

Next, learn how to tell the difference between a wren vs a sparrow.

Emily Hannemann
Emily Hannemann is an associate editor for Birds & Blooms Digital. Throughout her years with the publication, she has written multiple articles for print as well as digital, all covering birding and gardening. In her role as associate editor, she is responsible for creating and editing articles on the subject of birding and gardening, as well as putting together Birds & Bloom's daily digital newsletter. After graduating from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a master's degree in magazine journalism and undergraduate degrees in journalism and English, she has more than eight years of experience in the magazine, newspaper, and book industries.