Songbirds

With bird calls that range from sweet-sounding to demanding, there are many types of songbirds in North America. From the common American robin to the brightly-colored blue jay, learn about their habitats and hear their bird songs.

Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

A lucky observer might see a row of sociable Cedar Waxwings perched on a branch, passing a berry down the line and back again, bill to bill, in a ceremony that ends when one swallows the food.

Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren

The loud, ringing call of the Carolina Wren is one of the commonest sounds of southeastern woods, where it is heard even in winter. The bird has been called “mocking wren” because it sometimes sounds like a catbird, kingfisher or certain other birds.

Blue Jay

Blue Jay

You won’t have to see this brash blue bird to know it’s on its way to pillage your feeder of sunflower seeds and peanuts. Its harsh cry is unmistakable.

Black Capped Chickadee

Black-Capped Chickadee

It’s one of the friendliest fliers in North America, and many have convinced the Black-Capped Chickadee to eat from their hand.

American Robin

American Robin

This average-size songbird is the standard by which all other songbirds are measured. Many consider the American Robin’s bright red breast a sign of spring.

Eastern Bluebird, Male

Eastern Bluebird

You won’t attract the Eastern Bluebird to your yard with seed, but there is another secret ingredient that will surely get its attention: mealworms.