10 of the Prettiest Pink Tulips for Your Garden

From adorable to dazzling, here are the best choices for pink tulips you can plant now for a gorgeous spring flower garden.

1658 Virichic Cgc4880qp
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Virichic Pink Tulips

Tulipa ‘Virichic’

Lily-flowered tulip, 18″, Zones 3 to 7

This stunner elevates borders and arrangements with elegant lily-shaped flowers striped in fresh pink and green. Long-blooming pink tulips extend the season into May, last well in a vase, and are good landscape performers.

Why we love it: Those curves! The sinuous lines of the petals accentuated by this tulip’s striping make an unforgettable combo.

Check out the top 10 types of tulips to plant in your garden.

tulip angelique
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Angélique

Tulipa ‘Angelique’

Double late tulip, 12 to 14″, Zones 3 to 8

Looking like an heirloom rose, ‘Angelique’ was a favorite of garden design icon Rosemary Verey, and is the top-selling tulip for White Flower Farm. It bears several semidouble ruffled blooms per stem, in a silvery shade of pink on a white base. It’s also great for forcing for an early taste of spring indoors.

Why we love it: ‘Angelique’ adds a romantic touch to borders and bouquets and its lush shape creates a striking contrast to single pink tulips.

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Tulipa Bakeri Lilac Wonder
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Lilac Wonder

Tulip bakeri ‘Lilac Wonder’

Species tulip, 6 to 8″, Zones 4 to 8

Sporting a charming combination of mauve petals and sunny yellow center, this award-winning long-blooming species tulip is easy to tuck around perennials, in the rock garden, or in pots. Blooming in May, it’s lovely paired with similarly diminutive daffodils like Narcissus ‘Hawera’.

Why we love it: While many tulips are treated as annuals, species or botanical tulips are some of the easiest to keep in the garden for years of repeat enjoyment. ‘Lilac Wonders’ are long-lived pink tulips that can naturalize in sunny, well-drained spots mimicking their native Mediterranean hillsides.

Check out 8 pretty pink daffodil varieties.

pretty princess tulips
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Pretty Princess

Tulipa ‘Pretty Princess’

Single Early, 12-14″, Zones 3-8

Can’t decide between warm and cool pink tulips? ‘Pretty Princess’ is a veritable sunset of lilac, salmon, and merlot flames – and that’s just the March-into-April flowers. Their multi-hued March-April blossoms make them a perfect partner to bridge competing colors. Plant enough for cutting – it’s a strong cut flower, and the sturdy stems hold up well to spring showers.

Why we love it: Before and after the blooms you’ll enjoy gorgeous cream-edged foliage that makes companions sparkle.

Learn how and when to plant tulip bulbs.

pink impression tulip
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Pink Impression

Tulipa ‘Pink Impression’

Darwin hybrid, 24 to 26″, Zones 3a to 8b

The quintessential flower arranger’s pink tulip, with graceful stems and large cup-shaped blooms in a clear, go-with-anything rose pink. Statuesque Darwin hybrids are garden team players, blooming in sun or partial shade, and shrugging off blustery weather.

Why we love it: Darwins are touted as the most reliable tall tulips for returning in the garden for repeat seasons, and ‘Pink Impression’ is a classic.

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toronto tulip
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Toronto

Tulipa ‘Toronto’

Greigii or bunch-flowering, 14″, Zones 3 to 7

Each stem a mini bouquet, ‘Toronto’ glows in cerise with a bronze-green base for extra sizzle. For a fab garden combo, try this cherry-pink tulip with blue glory of the snow Chinidoxa luciliae.

Why we love it: The smaller plants pack a lot of bloom into a small space, with mottled foliage setting off the colorful flowers beautifully.

Discover 6 fascinating tulip facts you don’t know.

fancy frills pink tulips
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Fancy Frills

Tulipa ‘Fancy Frills’

Fringed/crispa, 16 to 22″, Zones 3 to 8

This pink tulip is a fringed confection with vibrant rose tracing a white base and flames, ‘Fancy Frills’ adds an eye-catching edge to highlight spring borders and bouquets.

Why we love it: That lacy frill, a perfect counterpoint to the silky texture of classic tulips, can jumpstart countless exciting combinations.

Learn how to grow a tulip poplar tree.

janis joplin tulip
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Janis Joplin

Tulipa ‘Janis Joplin’

Triumph, 16 to 20″ Zones 3 to 8

‘Janis Joplin’ is as unforgettable as her namesake, with a tie-dye of lavender-pink, apricot, and steely blue that vibrates in harmony with other spring pastels in the garden. Triumph tulips are more compact than Darwin hybrids, but with the same sturdy stems to hold up to wind and rain.

Why we love it: The combination of its unforgettable lilac sheen and sweet reflexed petals makes it a rock star in the garden or a vase.

Psst—you’ll fall in love with White Honeymoon tulips.

menton pink tulip
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Menton

Tulipa ‘Menton’

Single Late, 26″, Zones 3 to 8A

Chameleon dancing between pink, salmon, and apricot depending on the light, and the day, ‘Menton’ shimmers in the May garden.

Why we love it: ‘Menton’ is a tetraploid variety, delivering clusters of blooms on each stem, and is a vigorous grower.

We found 10 bulbs to plant in fall that you aren’t growing yet.

apricot parrot pink tulips
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Apricot Parrot

Tulipa ‘Apricot Parrot’

Parrot, 18 to 22″ Zones 3 to 8

Flickering with flames of apricot, cream, rose, magenta, yellow, and green, this parrot tulip’s petals are distinctively cupped and scalloped. Each blossom’s coloring is unique, with each one more outrageous than the next.

Why we love it: Beyond the rich tapestry of colors, ‘Apricot Parrot’ emits a gentle fragrance and is a great cut flower.

Next, check out 10 of the best daffodil bulbs to grow.

Erica Browne Grivas
"A longtime journalist and avid gardener, Erica Browne Grivas' writing explores the interplay of humans and nature. In addition to Birds & Blooms, she writes for publications like the Seattle Times, Horticulture, GardenRant, Pacific Horticulture and Digger Magazine, as well as contributing two columns for local Washington newspapers on gardening and health and wellness. She is a content consultant for Pacific Horticulture, aiding with website language, overall content, and video production. Garden Communicators International has awarded her both Silver and Gold medals of excellence for her garden features and columns. She has studied landscape design, worked in nurseries on two coasts, and represented garden media nationally as a director of Garden Communicators International. Before turning her attention to gardening, she started in journalism writing for the New York Post and then in television production at "Inside Edition." She loves sharing accurate, inspiring information to help people experience the joy of engaging with nature."