Pansies: Overwintering Them

If you’re anything like me, you’re always looking to extend the seasons of color in your garden. This year, instead

If you’re anything like me, you’re always looking to extend the seasons of color in your garden. This year, instead of planting twice — mums for fall color and bulbs for early spring blooms — plant pansies once for two to three seasons of color!

Advancements in the garden industry have created new varieties of spreading and trailing pansies that are even more tolerant of cold temperatures so northern gardeners, up to USDA Hardiness Zone 5, can overwinter pansies for a burst of color again in the spring.

In fact, these hardy annual varieties are able to withstand light frost. When planted in fall, these pansies will return in spring along with colorful bulbs, and for some gardeners in the South, pansies can bloom throughout mild winter months!

If you’re interested in digging in and planting pansies this season, here’s a simple list of Do’s and Don’ts for overwintering.

  • Do — Plant pansies in a location with full sun during the fall, winter and spring. Pansies can be planted in containers and hanging baskets, but be sure to transplant into the ground for overwintering.
  • Don’t — Worry about protecting pansies with straw or branches when temperatures start to drop. Pansies are resilient, and will withstand frost and will still overwinter if left uncovered for the winter.
  • Do — Check to make sure where your home falls within the USDA Hardiness Zone. These new pansies won’t overwinter north of Zone 5. You can find out your location here.
  • Do — Enjoy your pansies until the heat strikes, usually into mid-May in the South and into June in the North.

What color of pansies are you thinking of including in your yard this year?