How to Gift Wrap a Potted Plant

Unsure how to wrap a plant gift? Cookie tins from the dollar store make the perfect colorful containers for holiday plant gifts.

How to Wrap a Plant

I love gifting potted plants, especially at the holidays. This is a gift the recipient can enjoy for a long time to come, and surprisingly nice selections are usually available at your grocery store. The only thing I don’t like is the foil wrapping that  these plants often come in; I prefer to take a few more minutes to personalize my gift plants in some way. This year, I stumbled across an incredibly easy solution for how to wrap plant gifts, just by using some cookie tins I found at the bargain store. Not sure what kind of plants to give? Check out easy-care holiday houseplants.

how to Wrap a Potted Plant

I liked these tins because they were taller instead of shallow. Most stores have a wide variety of tins available this time of year, so you should be able to find some that work for you.

Wrap a Potted Plant

I left the plants in their original pots and removed the foil wrapping. The small Christmas cactus on the left slid right in.

Wrap a Potted Plant

The bigger poinsettia had a wide lip on the pot that made it a little too big to slide all the way down. I solved that problem in no time by trimming the rim with a pair of scissors. Once I had the plants in the pots, I quickly made up some holiday tags using some wooden stakes I picked up at the craft store last summer, along with some wrapping paper and Mod Podge.

Wrap a Potted Plant

I haven’t decided what to do with the lids from the tins, yet – I may give them to my recipient so they can use the tin for something else along the line if they decide to re-pot the plant eventually.

Wrap a Potted Plant

If you have trouble finding tins you like, there are still plenty of options out there for dressing up your potted plant gifts. Happy gifting!

Next, check out the best gift ideas for gardeners.

Jill Staake
Jill Staake's lifelong love of nature turned into a career during the years she spent working with native Florida butterflies, caterpillars, and other wildlife at the Museum of Science & Industry in Tampa, Florida. During this time, she helped to maintain 30+ acres of gardens and backwoods, all carefully cultivated to support the more than 20 species of butterflies displayed indoors and out. She now writes for a variety of publications and sites on topics like gardening and birding, among others.