6 Gorgeous Peony Colors to Grow in Your Garden

From bright pink to coral and vibrant yellow, these peony colors will brighten up your garden! Plus, discover the best cultivars for each color.

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Breck's Sorbet Peony
Via Breck's
Sorbet peony

Pink Peonies

If you’re searching for pink peony colors, you’re in luck—there’s no shortage. The ‘Takara’ (Treasure) Itoh peony offers unique color-changing abilities that’ll add dramatic flair to your garden. The blooms start out predominantly yellow and pink and then change to pale white, with a brush of burgundy in the center. In addition, the ‘Sorbet’ peony boasts 6- or 7-inch blooms, and its foliage turns red in fall for a delightful burst of color in your backyard.

If you’re wanting something in a softer pink, ‘Chiffon Parfait’ peony is a lighter shade of salmon. Also look for the elegant, classic Sarah Bernhardt peony.

Learn how to grow and care for peony flowers.

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Via Breck's
Sunny Girl peony

Yellow Peonies

The ‘Misaka’ Itoh Peony starts with orange blooms that transition to a sunny yellow with flashes of red at the center. The grower notes the flowers are especially disease-resistant and produce a mild fragrance.

The ‘Sunny Girl’ peony starts with yellow flowers that shift to chartreuse the longer they’re in bloom. This particular plant is deer-resistant and very early flowering (flowers in early to mid-spring).

If you love peony colors, you’ll enjoy these stunning photos of peonies in full bloom.

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Via Walters Gardens, Inc.
Festiva Maxima peony

White Peonies

For those looking to add a snow-colored peony to their garden, several options are available. One choice is the ‘Festiva Maxima’ peony, which features large white blooms with pink centers. The plant draws in butterflies, too.

Another option is the ‘Gardenia’ peony, which the grower notes is one of the most fragrant varieties of peony flowers. For a little extra interest, plant ‘Top Brass’ peony, which features white petals on the outside and yellow petals on the inside.

Interested in fancy flowers and foliage? Try growing a fernleaf peony.

red charm peony
Via Eden Brothers
Red Charm peony

Red Peonies

Add a burst of blushing red to your garden with the ‘Many Happy Returns’ peony. The flower blooms in late spring to early summer, and the grower notes that it makes an excellent choice for a cut flower garden.

For more red in your flower beds, try the ‘Red Charm’ peony or ‘Cherry Hill’ peony.

Psst—no matter which color you prefer, you should plant peonies in fall for the best success.

coral peony
Via Dutchgrown.com
Pink Hawaiian Coral peony

Coral Peonies

For blooms that are both pink and orange, look no further than the Coral Charm peony, which butterflies love. Another coral option is the Pink Hawaiian Coral peony, which features coral-colored petals offset by a gorgeous yellow center. This beauty was an American Peony Society Gold Medal Selection.

Uncover the truth behind a common garden belief: do peonies need ants to bloom?

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Via Breck's
Seeing Blue peony

Purple and Blue Peonies

There aren’t as many purple and blue peonies, but if you’re looking to add these colors to your garden, there are a few options. While a Seeing Blue peony’s blooms are technically considered pink, the grower notes that the flowers “have a bluish glow.” Morning Lilac Itoh peony flowers have a coloring between pink and purple, making for a perfect balance between the shades.

Next, discover little-known facts about peonies to impress your gardener friends.

Emily Hannemann
Emily Hannemann is an associate editor for Birds & Blooms Digital. Throughout her years with the publication, she has written multiple articles for print as well as digital, all covering birding and gardening. In her role as associate editor, she is responsible for creating and editing articles on the subject of birding and gardening, as well as putting together Birds & Bloom's daily digital newsletter. After graduating from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a master's degree in magazine journalism and undergraduate degrees in journalism and English, she has more than eight years of experience in the magazine, newspaper, and book industries.