Top 10 Easy Gardening Plants

Tired of flowers that won't bloom or can't stand a dry spell? Try one or all of these picks for easy gardening!

As gardeners, we are constantly faced with challenges: plants that won’t bloom, flowers that die after a late-spring frost, droughts that wipe out entire beds. Gardening definitely has its fair share of difficulties, so every once in a while it’s nice to do some easy gardening that requires minimal maintenance. For the most part, these top picks are hardy, trouble-free and suitable for nearly any North American backyard.

PerennialResource.com
Bee Balm

Bee Balm

Monarda, Zones 3 to 9

This flower’s unusual shape makes it a standout. Shades of purple, red, pink and white not only add brilliant color to the garden, but also attract butterflies and hummingbirds. For extra ease, choose
mildew-resistant Marshall’s Delight or Jacob Cline.

RDA-GID
California Poppy

California Poppy

Eschscholzia californica, annual

Sweeping across the arid foothills and valleys west of the Sierra Nevada, a sea of golden-orange California poppies lights up the landscape each spring. The delicate, nodding blooms are ideal in rock and cottage gardens, rather than in formal flower beds. Just be ready to do some deadheading to limit reseeding opportunities.

Future Plants
Coral Bells

Coral Bells

Heuchera, Zones 3 to 9

Coral bells’ tall, airy flower spikes rise elegantly above mounds of evergreen foliage that comes in a rainbow of colors. This plant works especially well in borders and containers, thriving in sun or shade. In addition to classic shades, coral bells’ foliage come in some unusual colors, such as black, silver, amber and even bronze.

Impatiens

Impatiens

Impatiens, annual in most zones

Reliable impatiens are shade-garden favorites throughout North America, and quickly grow to fill in bare areas with undulating mounds of color. Once planted, impatiens need very little care. Plants bloom from spring to first frost and, unlike some other annuals, require no deadheading.

RDA-GID
Lamb’s Ear

Lamb’s Ear

Stachys byzantina, Zones 4 to 8

Easily recognized by its woolly silvery-gray foliage, lambs’ ears is a trusty bedding plant and ground cover that also makes a wonderful companion plant. Standing about 18 inches tall, lambs’ ears thrives in full sun to partial shade. You can’t go wrong with its long growing season: early summer to frost.

W. Atlee Burpee & Co.
Nasturtium

Nasturtium

Tropaeolum • annual

This cheerful flower thrives on neglect. Once it’s established, the nasturtium performs best when left alone, providing vivid color from spring through frost. Some types have compact, mounded growing habits, while others are good climbers. This flower also makes a zesty addition to a green salad.

Ball Horticultural Company
Pansy

Pansy

Viola x wittrockiana, Zones 4 to 8

This colorful flower is best known for the whiskered “faces” that mark many of the blooms. The majority of pansy varieties are annuals, though some live longer. Most perform best in cooler weather, so in many warm climates, some cultivars are used as delightful winter annuals.

PerennialResource.com
Peony

Peony

Paeonia, Zones 3 to 9

A peony’s fresh, heady scent simply can’t be beat. In late spring, bushy plants burst with lush, showy purple, white, red, yellow and pink blooms that make this flower a favorite choice to use in colorful beds and bouquets.

PerennialResource.com
Siberian Iris

Siberian Iris

Iris sibirica, Zones 3 to 9

An easy-care garden staple, Siberian iris produces white or jewel-toned flowers that can be planted in formal flower beds or naturalized for a more rustic look. Just be sure to plant it in moist soil.

W. Atlee Burpee & Co.
Sunflower

Sunflower

Helianthus annuus, annual

There’s something about a sunflower’s bright face that makes you feel good. And when it comes to kids, there are few plants that draw more “oohs” and “aahs” than these towering blooms, which can soar up
to 15 feet! The centers are composed of tiny, nectar-producing flower clusters that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Flowers range from red to yellow to white.

Jill Staake
Jill lives in Tampa, Florida, and writes about gardening, butterflies, outdoor projects and birding. When she's not gardening, you'll find her reading, traveling and happily digging her toes into the sand on the beach.