Birding

From helpful bird species profiles to expert tips on attracting birds to your yard – we have all the information you need to start birding.

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Tree Swallow

The hardiest swallow, it arrives early in spring and even winters over in some localities. When insects are unavailable, the...


Spotted Towhee

Once grouped with its eastern counterpart in a species called the rufous-sided towhee, the Spotted Towhee now has its own...


Song Sparrow

Ornithologists recognize more than 30 subspecies of the remarkably adaptable Song Sparrow. Because song sparrows seem to learn the structure...


Screech Owl

It’s difficult to distinguish between Eastern and Western Screech Owl species by sight - location is your best bet. However,...


Red-Headed Woodpecker

The Red-Headed Woodpecker has several colorful nicknames, including flag bird, jelly coat, patriotic bird and shirttail bird.


Red-Bellied Woodpecker

The name Red-Bellied Woodpecker is misleading, for the red patch on its belly is rather faint. It occasionally feeds in...


Purple Martin

Native Americans once attracted these voracious insect eaters by hanging gourd houses near their villages. Purple Martins nest in colonies...


Purple Finch

In late summer, the Purple Finch begins to molt, and in winter plumage, a male’s reddish areas appear frosted. With...

Pine Siskin

Prone to irruptions in wintertime, Pine Siskins are cute little nomads whose range spans throughout the United States and Canada....


Pileated Woodpecker

As big as a crow, the pileated woodpecker is the largest member of the woodpecker family in North America. Its...


Northern Mockingbird

This around-the-clock songster doesn’t just copy the sounds other birds make. Northern Mockingbirds mimic other things, too - even inanimate...


Northern Flicker

This unusual woodpecker is often seen on the ground, searching for ants and licking them up with its long tongue....


Northern Cardinal

Unlike members of most avian species, both male and female Northern cardinals sing. Pairs make a habit of counter-singing, where...


Mourning Dove

A gentle and entertaining nester, the Mourning Dove raises as many as five broods each year! The whistling noise it...


Mountain Bluebird

The state bird of Idaho and Nevada, it’s not hard to see why Mountain Bluebirds are among the West’s most...


Mallard

Remarkably adaptable to civilization, the mallard—the most common duck in the world—will nest in a city park if there is...

Killdeer

When something approaches its nest, the Killdeer spreads its wings and tail, scolds and may even fly at it. If...


House Wren

The House Wren is plain to be sure, but its tenacity and nonstop activity make this backyard nester a pleasure...


House Finch

A western species until the 1940s, the House Finch was introduced to the East Coast by an unethical pet dealer....


Hairy Woodpecker

Almost identical to the Downy Woodpecker, the Hairy Woodpecker is larger in size and has a much heavier, longer bill.


Gray Catbird

Don’t let the Gray Catbird fool you with its mimic calls. It can easily imitate the songs of other popular...

Eastern Towhee

When you’re watching for this songbird, look out below. The Eastern Towhee spends most of its time on the ground,...


Eastern Phoebe

Eastern Phoebes made ornithological history in 1804 when John James Audubon tied silver thread on the legs of nestlings -...


Downy Woodpecker

Frequent backyard visitors, Downy Woodpeckers may form pairs very early in the season, tapping out their courtship song on a...


Dark-Eyed Junco

There are more than a dozen recognized “races” of the dark-eyed junco, from the most basic slate-gray with a white...


Cedar Waxwing

A lucky observer might see a row of sociable Cedar Waxwings perched on a branch, passing a berry down...


Carolina Wren

The loud, ringing call of the Carolina Wren is one of the commonest sounds of southeastern woods, where it is...