How to Make a DIY Apron for Gardening

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This DIY apron is a handmade gift from the heart that will bring joy to anyone who loves gardening. Here's how to make it.

DIY Garden ApronCountry WomanDIY Apron Materials

  • 2/3 yd. 44-in.-wide outdoor-weight printed fabric
  • ½ yd. 60-in.-wide duck fabric in contrasting color
  • 3 yd. 1-in.-wide cotton webbing
  • Coordinating thread
  • Extra-wide, double-fold bias tape
  • 4-in. Velcro
  • Sewing machine
  • Heavy-duty sewing machine needle, size 90 /14
  • Iron

DIY Apron Directions

  1. Prewash both fabrics. Cut 5 pieces—1 front main floral and 1 contrasting back: 24×14-in.; 1 contrasting pocket: 24×9-in.; 1 pocket main floral: 28×7-in.; and 1 flap pocket floral: 7×6-in.
  2. Cut two 8-in. pieces of cotton webbing for tool loops.
  3. Make pocket flap by folding fabric in half, right sides together with 6-in.sides meeting. Stitch two 3½-in. sides with a 3/8-in. seam allowance. Turn right side out, poke out corners and press. Baste across open raw edge with a ¼-in. seam allowance. Topstitch remaining sides ¼-in. from edge. Center loop side of Velcro on underside of flap ¼-in. from bottom edge. Stitch around all 4 sides of Velcro.
  4. Baste pocket flap, Velcro side down, to top edge of contrasting pocket fabric ½ in. from right side edge.
  5. Topstitch bias tape to top edge of both of the pocket pieces.
  6. Attach hook side of Velcro to front of floral pocket piece 1½ in. from side edge and ¾ in. from top edge. Stitch around all 4 sides of Velcro.
  7. Layer contrasting pocket piece over floral main piece, matching bottom edge and sides. Baste around sides and bottom of pocket piece.
  8. Mark bottom edge of contrasting pocket piece starting from the left at 6, 12 and 18 in. Mark bottom edge of floral pocket piece starting from the left at 6, 7, 13, 14, 15, 21 and 22 in.
  9. Layer floral pocket piece on top of coordinating pocket piece, lining up bottom and side edges. Match up 6-in. marks, the 14-in. mark to the 12-in. mark, and the 22-in. mark to the 18-in. mark. Pin in place and stitch vertically from bottom to top edge of the pocket at these 3 places, as well as the side edges of the pockets.
  10. To make pleated pockets, bring 7-in. mark to 6-in. mark, the 13-in. mark to the 14-in. mark and the 21-in. mark to the 22-in. mark along bottom edge. Pin in place and baste across the bottom of the pockets using a ¼-in. seam allowance.
  11. Place contrasting fabric back on top of apron front, covering pockets. Pin around all 4 sides, leaving a 6-in. opening at the top. Stitch with short stitch length and a 3/8-in. seam allowance, being careful not to catch pocket flap in stitching. Clip corners. Turn apron right side out through opening at the top. Carefully poke out corners. Press all seams. Topstitch all 4 edges of apron.
  12. To reinforce pocket dividers, stitch a second time over the original pocket stitch lines from bottom edge and extending to top edge of apron.
  13. Mark center of one 8-in. piece of webbing. Turn under raw edges of webbing and stitch down on each end. Place webbing on apron front 1½ in. from top right edge, lining up ends of webbing with side edge of apron and nearest pocket divider stitch line. Stitch ends in place. Stitch marked center of webbing to the center of the area between the ends. Repeat steps on left side of apron.
  14. Hem both ends of remaining length of webbing by turning under ½ in. and then another ½ in. Stitch to secure. Find center of length of webbing and line it up with center of apron’s top edge. Pin in place. Stitch close to both edges of webbing. Reinforce at side edges of apron with an “X in a square” pattern.

If you’re interested in purchasing an apron, rather than sewing your own, visit Purple Pincushion. Each apron is $65, in a choice of colorful floral fabrics.

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Looking for more gift ideas? Check out the top 10 best holiday gifts for gardeners.

Originally Published in Country Woman