Top 10 to Grow From Plant Cuttings

Spread the splendor of your garden with these 10 beauties, perfect for starting from plant cuttings.

I’ve never met a gardener who didn’t want to share or expand his or her garden. And there are so many ways to do just that. One easily overlooked way is by taking plant cuttings. You can take a snip of a plant to start a whole new one – for yourself or a friend! Bear in mind that you can’t take a cutting from a plant that is patented. That’s usually any new variety, but you can tell by checking the plant tag. Most old family favorites and garden classics are fine to use for cuttings. Most important, though: Don’t get discouraged if growing from plant cuttings doesn’t work the first couple of times around. It can be a tricky process and takes some trial and error.

Be proactive. It’s best to take cuttings from recently watered plants. The cuttings will be healthier when taken from plants that are full of moisture.
Be prepared. Make sure you have a clean, sharp knife or a good pair of pruning shears handy to make the cuts.
Be mindful. Take cuttings only from healthy plants. Make sure the parent plants are disease- and pest-free. Early morning is the best time to take cuttings.
Be patient. Not all plant cuttings will root at the same speed, so if one plant takes 10 days and another takes 20 days, don’t be alarmed.
Be experimental. Be prepared for this process to fail from time to time. And don’t be afraid to experiment with other plants, just to see what happens.

Geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum), Annual

Geraniums have so many virtues, and they don’t always get enough credit. Sure, they’re somewhat old-fashioned, but they’re pretty, sun-loving, long-lasting, tough, and perfect in containers and window boxes.

Taking cuttings: Make sure your tools, rooting mix and pots are sterilized; geraniums are very susceptible to disease. At the end of summer, make a cut about 4 inches down from one of the growing tips of the plant, remove flowers and buds, and place cuttings in a pot. They should root within 20 days. You can also try a rooting hormone for increased success.

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