Vegetable of the week—Peppers

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by margba margba 7 months, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #5134885 Report Abuse
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    wilderness_NY_Z4
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    Peppers, green peppers, red peppers, yellow peppers, sweet peppers, hot peppers.  There are so many choices to choose from. Peppers are a mainstay in my garden even though sweet bell peppers are a real challenge to grow here in the north country.

     

    OVERVIEW:
    Peppers are one of the most versatile vegetables in the garden and will grow in many areas, including northern Canada. Sow pepper seeds indoors or in hot beds in very early spring for good germination, and then keep the seedlings warm. Transplant peppers after all risk of frost is past. Mulching well help to keep the ground moist and produce quality peppers.

    Harvest when peppers have a high gloss as green bells or wait for maturity when they are red and sweet. Peppers have very high levels of Vitamin C and also contain Vitamin A. Great raw or in a variety of cooked dishes, salads and salsa.

    PROPAGATION / SOWING OF PEPPERS:
    Peppers require a long, warm growing season. Pepper seed should be started indoors in March or 8 weeks prior to transplanting. To start pepper seed indoors, sow 2-3 seeds ¼” deep, into 1×1” cells and provide constant moisture and a soil temperature of 26-29°C (80-85°F). After germination (1-2 weeks), thin pepper seedlings to one per cell. Once seedlings develop 2-3 true leaves, transplant into larger containers, 2×2” or 3×3”. At transplanting time, set pepper transplants 18” apart in rows 30” apart.

    COMPANION PLANTING FOR PEPPERS:
    Peppers do well with carrots, onions, parsnip, peas and basil.

    CARE & GROWING OF PEPPERS:
    Peppers prefer sheltered, full sun area with a soil pH of 6.0-6.8. Peppers are moderate feeders and require plenty of compost and well rotted manure mixed into the soil prior to planting. Fertilize sparingly until pepper plants start to set fruit. Too much nitrogen causes an excess of foliage and dropping of flower buds. Provide even moisture, particularly during flowering and fruit set on pepper plants. Use black plastic or paper mulch to attract heat, hold water and prevent weeds.

    HARVESTING PEPPERS:
    Begin harvest when peppers reach a useable size. Cut peppers rather than pull from branch.

    PEPPER PROBLEMS:
    Blossoms will drop when temperature falls below 60°F (15°C) or goes above 80°F (27°C). Blossom End Rot Pepper fruits blacken and decay at the blossom end due to a calcium deficiency. Poor Fruit Set usually due to cold weather. Excessive nitrogen fertilizer during early growth may also delay fruit set.

    On thing not mentioned above, peppers love magnesium.  A good source is Epsom Salts.  1 tablespoon to 1 gallon of water sprayed on the leaves.  It is good to do this just as the blossoms start to form.  This will aid in blossom set.

    The one thing I do differently is plant the peppers closer together.  An old farmer once told me peppers are touchy feely plant that like to be close to their neighbor.  This advice has never failed me.

    Information from USA gardener.


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    Community Team Member wildernessny@gmail.com

    • This topic was modified 8 months ago by Jill Staake Jill Staake.
    #5134902 Report Abuse
    steve232__nc
    steve232__nc
    Participant

    Bette I love growing peppers. I grow bell peppers and the Hungarian Yellow Wax peppers. Like you I do try growing my peppers close so they can touch as they mature. One really good thing about peppers is as you mentioned you can pick the first ones when they are green and leave some to turn red, orange, yellow or purple. I hope to get mine in the garden in another week or so depending on what the weather guessers are saying for the extended guess this weekend.

    And heres some pickled peppers using a great recipe I got from Bette.

     


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    #5134909 Report Abuse

    Cowgirlok
    Participant

    Nice looking peppers, I just put my in the ground this weekend. I also plant them close together….

    Please share recipe.

     

    Thank you,


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    Grandmaof2
    Grandmaof2
    Participant

    I am so behind in mine this year. I haven’t even transplanted them. Perhaps I can get that done tonight. Our weather has been so crazy. Normally it is consistently warmer by now. Mine are in the gh, but still in the tp pots. I will transplant them and give them a little time before putting them in the ground. Thanks for the info on putting them close together. The past few years I have grown them in large pots and they have done better than in the past. Perhaps it was because I put the pots up against each other and when the peppers got to a decent size they were touching each other? Now I don’t know if I should put them in the ground or in pots again.

    Thanks for the info on the Epsom salts. I haven’t tried that before.


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    #5134926 Report Abuse
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    Participant

    Steve, nice looking peppers and your pickled peppers look great.  They were the Hungarian Wax weren’t they?

    As far as planting my peppers, I have them in raised beds and use square foot gardening for them.  I put 2 plants in every square foot and it works out great.

    Leslie, peppers do well in pots.  If the pots are approximately 1 foot square on the top you could put 2 in the pot.

    Vickie, the recipe for the pickled peppers is just a simple salt/vinegar brine.

    2 1/4 qt. water

    1 pt vinegar

    1/2 C canning salt

    Heat to hot but not boiling.  Fill jars with peppers, pour brine over, cap and process in a hot water bath for 15 minutes.


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    #5135478 Report Abuse
    dena1123
    dena1123
    Participant

    We do Bell Peppers, Hungarian and Jalapenos.  One year we did Habanero’s, way to spicy.  All little bit of those goes a long way.

    The last couple of years our Bell’s have done very well.  So I like to make large pans of Stuffed Peppers, freeze them for quick meals.  I am defrosting some right now for dinner to go into oven. I also like to dice them, lay them on cookie sheet for quick freeze and then into Ziploc Freezer bag, for quick and easy throw ins for soups, chili, casseroles, etc.

    Jalapenos for Roasted Salsa, Bacon Wrapped Poppers and frozen the same way as Bells.

    I love the Hungarian for Grilling and Pickled.

    We have a long way to go before any of ours get to go in the ground but my seeds are doing very well for now!


    #5135556 Report Abuse

    mockingbird_ca_f
    Participant

    I grew mine over the winter I’m proud to say i have baby peppers..


    #5135558 Report Abuse
    growingranny_va_z7
    growingranny_va_z7
    Participant

    I grow a lot of peppers all colors and different kinds of heat. One of the things I have to eat for my eyes is colored peppers, red, orange and yellow. I also grow Peter Peppers which are pretty hot!


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    #5135563 Report Abuse
    margba
    margba
    Participant

    Great info here!  Thanks, you all!  I will do the epsom salt this yr.  Bette, my Amish neighbor who has been growing stuff of course, since about age 1, says the same thing about peppers being a touchy feely type plant!  Lol!  Kind of a funny thing to say but very right on!


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