Vegetable Of The Week 3/17/14… Lettuce

Home Forums Gardening Veggie Gardening Vegetable Of The Week 3/17/14… Lettuce

This topic contains 8 replies, has 6 voices, and was last updated by wilderness_NY_Z4 wilderness_NY_Z4 4 months, 3 weeks ago.

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  • #5116693 Report Abuse
    steve232__nc
    steve232__nc
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    There are many varieties of lettuce and I’m not about to try and mention each variety here. All lettuce does best in cool weather so is best grown early or late summer as the days begin to cool down. Below is some information I found on the Mother Earth Site.

    From baby leaf lettuce to big, crisp heads, growing lettuce is easy in spring and fall, when the soil is cool. Leaf color and texture vary with variety. All types of lettuce grow best when the soil is kept constantly moist, and outside temperatures range between 45 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Prepare your planting bed by loosening the soil to at least 10 inches deep. Mix in an inch or so of good compost or well-rotted manure. Sow lettuce seeds a quarter of an inch deep and 1 inch apart in rows or squares, or simply broadcast them over the bed.

    Sow lettuce seeds in flats or small containers kept under fluorescent lights. Harden off three-week-old seedlings for at least two or three days before transplanting.

    Harvest lettuce in the morning, after the plants have had all night to plump up with water. Wilted lettuce picked on a hot day seldom revives, even when rushed to the refrigerator. Pull (and eat) young plants until you get the spacing you want. Gather individual leaves or use scissors to harvest handfuls of baby lettuce. Rinse lettuce thoroughly with cool water, shake or spin off excess moisture, and store it in plastic bags in the refrigerator. Lettuce often needs a second cleaning as it is prepared for the table.
    Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/organic-gardening/growing-lettuce-zmaz08amzmcc.aspx#ixzz2wBhyNO4E</div>

     


    Now we’d like to hear about your experiences with growing lettuce and of course we welcome any questions.  Its likely someone on here will have an answer for you.


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    • This topic was modified 5 months, 2 weeks ago by steve232__nc steve232__nc.
    #5116734 Report Abuse
    Grandmaof2
    Grandmaof2
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    My last attempt wasn’t so great because I planted them in a big pot on my deck and the raccoon ended up digging in that pot, so last year it just had my nicotiana. This year I would like to put some of my lettuce and onions in the pots on the deck, but I would need to put some type of wire or netting on top to keep him out. Recently he has dug half the soil out of those pots and my buckets in the yard. He also turned over some of those buckets in the process.

    Anybody want a raccoon?

    I do have iceberg and leaf lettuce started and they have done ok since being transplanted into fiber pots. I just hope I didn’t mix them up too bad and don’t wait for a head to form on a leaf variety.  ; )


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    #5116762 Report Abuse
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    wilderness_NY_Z4
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    Steve nice choice for St. Patrick’s Day green leafy lettuce.  Here in the Arctic I can grow lettuce all summer and as long as it is kept well watered it won’t bolt.  I do plant in successions about 3 weeks apart.  In the past I have done a ruby leave lettuce and a Romaine.  This year I am hoping to try some bib lettuce which I will start inside and transplant.

    I love leaf lettuce for sandwiches and the fact that you can pick the lower leaves and it continues to grow from the center producing many crops over the summer for me.  The romaine takes a little longer to mature but is great in salads as it is nice and crispy.

    Since I do square foot gardening I usually plant 2 square feet of each variety with each planting.  The recommended planting is 4 plants per square foot with to me is more for head lettuce.  I usually do 9 plants per square foot and it works out just fine.

    The only draw back to growing lettuce that I have found is slugs.  I have never tried the beer in a cover for them but do know that crushed egg shells around the plant work quite well to keep them away.

    Leslie, hope you can do something about that pesky raccoon.  Maybe a have a heart trip.  That is how I got rid of them here.  Be sure you take them at least 3 towns away however as they have a way of finding their way home.  LOL


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    #5117102 Report Abuse
    steepdrive
    steepdrive
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    This is the first year I started lettuce seedlings inside.  Usually I sow directly into the garden.  Lettuce is up as is bok choy but not spinach.  It’s been almost 2 weeks.  I dug in one of the cells to see if the seed had even sprouted and nothing.  Not sure I even recognized the seed and I know I put two in each cell.

    I did not start the mesclun mix in side.  That will be sown outside once this latest 6 inches of new snow melts.  And I thought this would be the week I could start working in the garden.  Nope!


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    #5117569 Report Abuse
    Grandmaof2
    Grandmaof2
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    Bette, yesterday you had Gitti’s siggie, now Joanne’s. What is up with that, or should I say, how did you do that?


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    #5117769 Report Abuse
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    wilderness_NY_Z4
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    Steep, the only time I have ever started lettuce inside was to be grown in the pots I start them in.  However with the bib lettuce I do think I will try starting it early and then transplanting into the garden.  Not sure what is up with your spinach.  Haven’t grown it in years and always direct sowed it.

    Leslie, just showing off my multiple personalities.  LOL  Actually I was 3 different folks besides myself yesterday.  They are folks that are having trouble with their siggies and I was working on them to get them to work and the only way I can tell is by putting them in my signature box.


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    Community Team Member wildernessny@gmail.com

    #5117794 Report Abuse
    Gayle
    Gayle
    Participant

    Leslie, that’s ow I got my siggie to work; is by Bette putting it in hers first.  She’s been a big help with getting people’s siggies to work.  She has one left to do I think.

    Now to the lettuce.  I grow mine in pots as I don’t have a vegetable bed.  The weather has been so cold & unpredictable that I haven’t started it yet.  But a little warmer weather is coming up so I would say probably sometime in the next few days I’ll get it planted.   Which means I need to get some potting soil.


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    #5120872 Report Abuse
    cookielei_IN
    cookielei_IN
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    I plan to grow my lettuce this year in an old sheep tank. I grow romaine leave and buttercrunch. The year that it was so dry and hot here We had to water the entire garden at least weekly and I had lettuce all summer. I also will put my lettuce in very cold water to perk it up before eating it.


    #5128702 Report Abuse
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    wilderness_NY_Z4
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    bump


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