Transplanting Seedlings

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This topic contains 11 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by dena1123 dena1123 5 months, 4 weeks ago.

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  • #5107830 Report Abuse
    Gayle
    Gayle
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    Just how important is it to transplant seedlings?  I know when I buy plants in  cells packs the plants are ready to go into the ground  & the cell packs, for the most part,  are about the same size that I start my seeds in.  So why not just leave the seedlings in the cell packs till ready to plant out?   What about leaving them in the trays also?


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    #5107839 Report Abuse
    growingranny_va_z7
    growingranny_va_z7
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    Normally the big nurseries buy plugs and put them into the cell packs for sale. It is better if they are transplanted at least once to make better and stronger roots. I spent one whole spring in a big wholesale nursery transplanting plugs into cell packs.


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    #5107843 Report Abuse
    Gitti Z5
    Gitti Z5
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    Thanks for asking Gayle, I am thinking the same way…Gitti


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    #5107898 Report Abuse
    Gayle
    Gayle
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    Good answer Molly.  It is for the roots.  That makes sense.

    So I guess I”ll spend some time transplanting even if I don’t know where I am going to out them all.  I have a tray that must have close to 100 Bee Balm in it.  I think every seed germinated which is great but I don’t need 100 BB & I hate to just toss them.  I could maybe sell some but again WTH am I going to keep them in the meantime while they get bigger?  And that’s just the BB.  LOL


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    #5108163 Report Abuse
    luvmyb_b
    luvmyb_b
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    My thought was along the line of what Molly said, but she said it better and with authority behind it.  My things just get too leggy to stay in the trays that I start them in.  I have to get them into cell packs as soon as I reasonably can.


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    NW Ohio
    Zn5

    #5108175 Report Abuse

    hopscotch
    Participant

    I start my seeds in cell-paks and then transplant into either 5 oz paper cups or 9 inch styro cups, depending on the size of the plants.  I will probably transplant some of those in the smaller cups into the styro cups to get an even better root system on them, as well as encouraging the plants to grow a little bigger before they go outside.


    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by  hopscotch.
    #5108231 Report Abuse
    Gayle
    Gayle
    Participant

    That’s what I’ve been doing too Leroy & guess that’s what I’ll continue to do.

    Karen, do you put your trays under lights as soon as the seeds germinate?  That should keep them from getting leggy.

    I start some in trays & some in cell packs, depending on the size of the seed.


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    #5108324 Report Abuse
    luvmyb_b
    luvmyb_b
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    Gayle, I always use small fast food containers filled with seed starting mix to start my seeds.  I have lights shining on them almost from the beginning (before germination).  I don’t bottom heat anything, but things that say they need heat, I do put right next to the lights.  My lights are not necessarily the fluorescent bulb that most of you use, although, I do have a couple of those that I can use.  The lights I generally use are large spotlight plant growth bulbs.  I have two on each end of the table and one smaller one with a different bulb in it in the middle.  The table is in front of the french doors with windows on either side, so there is extra light from that.   I’m sure this system could be better, but it has worked for me in the past – most of the time.  When things require me to spread out a bit, we will get the fluorescent bulbs out to add to the mix.  I do a lot of rotating of my seedlings this way, but I am over there looking at them anyway.  :)   I may as well rotate them while I’m there.   Some things get leggier than others and I’ve just learned to live with it.

    Once they get their true leaves or get big enough that I feel  I have to transplant them, I put them into cell packs.


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    NW Ohio
    Zn5

    #5108347 Report Abuse
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    wilderness_NY_Z4
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    I’m with Molly and Leroy.  I start everything in flats and then usually into cell packs.  Some live in the cell packs until time to plant.  Others go into 2″ pots and when I run out of them I use 5 oz. plastic cups.

    Karen there are some plants that get leggy as soon as they germinate.  If they really get out of hand I transplant them even before they get their true leaves and bury the stem as much as possible.  This seems to slow them down and behave themselves.  Zinnias are my worst.  I swear they are 2″ tall as soon as they germinate.


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    #5108360 Report Abuse
    carross
    carross
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    Thanks, Gayle for asking the question, very interesting, I often thought the same way, why.  Now I know,

    Carol


    #5108378 Report Abuse
    luvmyb_b
    luvmyb_b
    Participant

    Been there and done that, Bette!  I wholeheartedly agree on the zinnias.  They can be such a booger that am contemplating direct sowing them this year.

    The Painted Tongue may be this way for me.  Their stems are awfully thin!


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    NW Ohio
    Zn5

    #5108952 Report Abuse
    dena1123
    dena1123
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    Great question…  I was wondering the same myself….  There is a lot of great tips from the more experienced seed starters and I also like to see how everyone has there own way..

     

    Have a Great Day everyone.


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