FOR THE MAGAZINE: How do you attract woodpeckers to your yard?

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 23 voices, and was last updated by sawdust_JCMo sawdust_JCMo 2 months ago.

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  • #5155825 Report Abuse

    raden1
    Participant

     <span style=”color: #444444; font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold; line-height: normal; font-size: 13px; background-color: #fbfbfb;”> </span><span style=”color: #444444; font-family: Arial; font-weight: bold; line-height: normal; font-size: 13px; background-color: #fbfbfb;”>  I am fortunate to live in the country with acreage so I have every kind native to North Mississippi in the wild and at my feeders. Pileated, Downy, Red-bellied, etc.. I leave the dead and rotted trees standing for them to nest and forage for insects and I have the most success with suet at my feeders.</span>


    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by  raden1.
    #5155837 Report Abuse
    SunshineNY6
    SunshineNY6
    Participant

    I put peanuts in the shell out for the bluejays but the woodpeckers like them as well.

     

    They are also attracted by putting out suet.

    And of course, standard wild bird seed.



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    #5155889 Report Abuse

    Monicaads
    Participant

    We have lots of trees so that does present a natural attraction. However the suet is a great way to attract them so that you can actually get a great view

     

     

     

     


    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by  Monicaads.
    #5156012 Report Abuse
    mary
    mary
    Participant

    I just hang store bought ones on the shepherds hook and the little wood peckers come usually in the early evenings, Mary in Ky 1.31pm


    #5156027 Report Abuse
    CardinalPuff
    CardinalPuff
    Participant

    I buy the Bordola Woodpecker seed blocks & set out 2 suet cages. I get Red Headed Woodpeckers, Downey, Hairy & Red Belly Sapsuckers, & the Ladder Back which is similar to the Red Belly Sapsucker.

     

     

     

     


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    #5156032 Report Abuse
    Bron
    Bron
    Participant

    One of the most common in the Dallas / Fort Worth area is the Red-bellied woodpecker. They actually like to come to my bird feeder and pick up a few seeds now and again. I have even caught one of the parents teaching its young how to enjoy a seed or two.

     


    • This reply was modified 4 months ago by Bron Bron.
    #5156091 Report Abuse

    blade collector
    Participant

    In the winter suet. In the summer they love black oil sunflower seeds. I feed birds year round so I do believe they just have families and stay with me. Lol. Most ash trees in my area are dead. I think mine is still alive because they eat the beetles killing all the others


    #5157402 Report Abuse
    Jill Staake
    Jill Staake
    Keymaster

    So many great suggestions here!


    Jill Staake (florida33girl@gmail.com)
    Birds & Blooms Community Manager
    Tampa, Florida Zone 9b

    #5158987 Report Abuse

    woodbutcher
    Participant

    Donald. on your crab apple tree if it has sap from the holes in it watch for humming birds coming to eat it.


    #5276948 Report Abuse
    sawdust_JCMo
    sawdust_JCMo
    Participant

    I keep a supply of homemade suet  on hand and have lots of woodpeckers.  In addition to the woodpeckers, I have found bluebirds, titmice, Carolina wrens, and several other native birds enjoy the suet. ( Not to mention the objectionable ones like starlings.)  Here is my recipe, it makes a lot but I feed a lot.   Some recipe include salt and sugar, but I find that they are not necessary.

    BIRD SUET

    2 pounds lard, (vegetable oil is not the same thing as animal fat)

    2 16 oz jars peanut butter, creamy or crunchy

    5 cups flour

    5 cups cornmeal

    5 cups oatmeal

    Melt the lard and peanut butter in a large pan, and then add the other three ingredients. Stir and bring the mixture to a low boil for 15 to 30 seconds. You need to get the mixture up to boiling temperature, so it “sets” and does not run in the heat. (Like making gravy or oatmeal.)

    If you want to add other “things” to the suet this is the time to do so, some people add nuts, seeds, fruit, etc , I do NOT find this to be beneficial, but be your own judge. If you add too much, you will need a larger pan or two pans.

    Remove from heat and pour into a 10X14 cake pan, let cool (overnight)  Remove from pan and cut it into 36 logs about 1X1X3  Wrap and store in a container in freezer.

     


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