Declaw pet nails or not??????

Home Forums Backyard Chat General Declaw pet nails or not??????

This topic contains 25 replies, has 16 voices, and was last updated by  trudy1180 1 month, 1 week ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #5271022 Report Abuse
    Stelios
    Stelios
    Participant

    I just rescued a 5 month old kitten.  I’ve made an appointment with the vet for a complete check up and vaccination.  I will also have the kitten neutered.  This is a point lynx Siamese kitten and boy are his nails sharp.  So I asked my family and friends for their opinion on declawing nails.  Some say it’s a horror story and other swear that’s the way to go to prevent either scratches or rips and tears.  Can you please give me your opinion.


    Stella
    Community Team Member

    #5271035 Report Abuse
    Carol Johnson
    Carol Johnson
    Participant

    Stella it is very painful for the cats and is cruel there are so many other ways to keep things safe from nails ..it was explained to me like cutting off part of your finger …


    x_3d759b92 photo x_3d759b92.gif

    #5271038 Report Abuse
    Carol Johnson
    Carol Johnson
    Participant

    here is some info on it…
    <h2>What is declawing?</h2>
    Too often, people think that declawing is a simple surgery that removes a cat’s nails—the equivalent of having your fingernails trimmed. Sadly, this is far from the truth.

    Declawing traditionally involves the amputation of the last bone of each toe. If performed on a human being, it would be like cutting off each finger at the last knuckle.

    It is an unnecessary surgery that provides no medical benefit to the cat. Educated pet parents can easily train their cats to use their claws in a manner that allows everyone in the household to live together happily.
    <h2>How is a cat declawed?</h2>
    The standard method of declawing is amputating with a scalpel or guillotine clipper. The wounds are closed with stitches or surgical glue, and the feet are bandaged.

    Another method is laser surgery, in which a small, intense beam of light cuts through tissue by heating and vaporizing it. However, it’s still the amputation of the last toe bone of the cat and carries with it the same long-term risks of lameness and behavioral problems as does declawing with scalpels or clippers.


    x_3d759b92 photo x_3d759b92.gif

    #5271041 Report Abuse
    Carol Johnson
    Carol Johnson
    Participant
    #5271043 Report Abuse

    xstitchlady_NS
    Participant

    You can train your cat not to claw the furniture, spray bottle with water and a scratching post for them.

    I seen something on TV not long ago of something that is put over the nail ( like a sheath ) to prevent them from scratching the furniture or people. I guess it is glued on some how.


    > photo ce743b80-b36a-4516-9ecc-8396880e5290_zps6e18ec3d.gif

    #5271044 Report Abuse
    Resa_NS
    Resa_NS
    Participant

    I wouldn’t, and believe my my cat has gotten me a few times, where she is an inside cat she doesn’t wear them down and she has damaged a few doors, But I would not put her through that, there are  caps that the vet can put on them like acrylic nails so they don’t scratch,


    #5271068 Report Abuse

    Posynut_NY_zone4
    Participant

    I wouldn’t want to put a pet through that declawing procedure.  Being neutered, yes, but not the declawing.  If they every accidentally got out of the house how would they protect themselves from another cat/dog/animal or get up in a tree to get away?  They would be pretty defenseless.


    #5271083 Report Abuse
    iris43
    iris43
    Participant

    One of the behaviour problems that Carol hinted at is problems with the litter box.

    My late husband had a cat when we married.  He’d had it de-clawed before I met him.  I had two cats.  When cat urine started appearing outside the litter box, I blamed it on one of my cats, thinking the move and adjustment had been too up-setting for whoever was doing it.  Then Germain’s cat died and the puddles stop appearing.

    That was when I read an article which noted de-clawed cats sometimes have this problem.  Apparently digging in the litter in the litterbox is not comfortable…….as is understandable when you realize they have to dig with those scarred toes.

    I have never had a cat de-clawed and after reading that and experiencing Kitty’s behaviour, I never would now.

    When I got new livingroom furniture, it took vigilance and creativity, but I managed to train my cats to not only stay off the furniture but also not to touch the new furniture at all.


    #5271094 Report Abuse
    Lizzie
    Lizzie
    Participant

    NO!  When I got my Scooter, he was just a little thing.  A friend suggested that I go RIGHT AWAY and buy him a scratchy post and show him how to use it.  I did.  I bought a small one at KMart that night.  I brought it home and I sat in front of it with him on my lap and popped out his claws and scratched his claws on that sisle cord post.  Man did he love that!  He has used it ever since.  Tigger does too.  But as they got older and bigger, I had to get a taller one because they like to S-T-R-E-T-C-H ooooooooooout while they claw—LOL..  Please,  please don’t declaw.


    #5271095 Report Abuse
    Lizzie
    Lizzie
    Participant

    BTW–they don’t touch my furniture


    #5271104 Report Abuse
    4mybackyardpa5
    4mybackyardpa5
    Participant

    I have never heard anything good about having them declawed. I have 2 cats [strictly inside] and if they would accidentally get out of the house they would have no way to defend them selves if they were declawed.When mine were little I sprinkled catnip on the post and showed them what to do, and have never had a bit of trouble. I am on my 2nd scratching post.

     


     photo 123.gif

    #5271105 Report Abuse
    Kennysgirl_ON
    Kennysgirl_ON
    Participant

    I have two cats….Stash and Charlie….I’ve had Stash since he was two days old…we got him declawed and neutered….Charlie was about 3 or 4 months old when we adopted him….we did not get him declawed but we did have him neutered….we have no problems with Charlie destroying furniture or walls…we have two scratching posts which Charlie uses regularly….I keep his nails trimmed….and I don’t have a problem….would I get another cat declawed?….probably not


    #5271133 Report Abuse
    Stelios
    Stelios
    Participant

    Thank you for all your comments.  I did learn from your posts that there is a way to train cats not to destroy furniture, etc.

    However, I am wondering if any of you have had your pet scratch another pet, like a dog.  I have a dog who was here before the kitty.  He has a right to live here.  Have you had accidents with cats that have not been declawed?

    On another note, have any of your children, or grandchildren, or even adutls been injured by a non declawed cat?  I have young grandkids so I am worried.  My new kitty has scratched me until my hand bled…..so far that is it.


    Stella
    Community Team Member

    #5271140 Report Abuse
    bwatcher
    bwatcher
    Participant

    My cat is declawed on the front only. We always clipped her hails and made them blunt as a kitten, but the older she got the nastier she got about clipping her claws. It was a physical battle to keep her claws trimmed and the battle wasn’t good for either of us. I gave in and had it done and I don’t regret it. She destroyed furniture and nothing we did made any difference. She had a pole to claw on but preferred the couch, the carpet, the beds. Once the claws were gone, her whole personality changed and she lost her temperamental streak and she couldn’t scratch the kids anymore. She used to jump on my daughter’s leg and bite her.

    Your kitten can easily have it’s claws trimmed using a simple finger nail nipper. You just press on the top of the foot as you hold it, so the claws come out. Look at the claw closely and see where the meat starts; it will be pink, the claw itself is white. All you have to do is clip the sharp points off the ends to make them blunt. Blunt claws prevent a kitten or cat from climbing up on things.

    My cat is over 16 yrs. old and uses clumping litter. She still flexes her claws on her cardboard scratching box even though she doesn’t have claws. She has never refused to use the litter box. She has never had sore feet, and they are not tender. I did have a cat that quit using the litter box but it was because of what I was using in the box. I had bought Litter Green cat litter and I found out that it will burn a cats feet and they will quit using the litter box. I got rid of that stuff right away when I found that out and never had a problem with that cat after that.


    #5271168 Report Abuse
    oldgirl06
    oldgirl06
    Participant

    I know cats can be trained to not claw the furniture, but you can not be with them all the time, and if they want to scratch, they will find a way to do it.

    While I agree it isn’t a pleasant way to solve the problem, the cats heal rather quickly, and with the cats I’ve had declawed, they have always used the litter box with no problems.

    I’m more worried about your cat scratching YOU!   That is unacceptable and if I were you, I would have his front claws removed.   You,  your grandchildren and your dog will then not be scratched.  Of course, depending on how you play with him, he can still scratch with his hind claws, so you will have to be careful not to provoke that!

    You deserve a cat you can enjoy, and if it means declawing him, then that is the only way to go.  Just do it and not feel guilty about it.  He will heal and he won’t blame you for doing it!  He won’t blame you for neutering him either!

    Just make sure he never gets outside.

     

     


    Find more about Weather in Rochester, MN

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 26 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.