Chitting Seed

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  • #5122904 Report Abuse
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    wilderness_NY_Z4
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    An old concept to help give the garden a jump start.  The term chitting or greensprouting is most often associated with starting potatoes for the garden but the same theory can also be used on seed.

    Potatoes are really easy to use this process on.  3-4 weeks before you are ready to plant you seed potatoes place them in a warm spot in a sunny window or under a fluorescent light and watch them sprout.  You may want to save some egg cartons to place the potatoes in so they won’t roll around.  Of course if you are planting a acre of potatoes this might not be practical but even with that if you want some new potatoes early to go with your fresh peas you may want to consider doing a few.  Once they have some nice sprouts on them they are ready to go in the garden.  Place them in the soil as usual being sure the sprouts are facing up and cover them carefully as the sprouts are very delicate.

    Now for seed there are a couple of methods.  One is with a jar and the other is a paper towel.

    Jar method:  Place you seed in a jar and cover them with warm water.  Let them soak for 4 hours but no more than 8 hours.  Drain off the water and rinse the seed draining off the water again.  Place a piece of cheese cloth or screening over the top of the jar and secure tightly.  If using a canning jar you can use the ring to hold it in place.  Lay the jar on its side in a warm place.  Repeat rinsing twice a day.  Once you see little roots emerging it is time to plant in soil.  Place the little root down or sideways and cover gently as the root is fragile.

    Paper Towel Method:Fold a paper towel in quarters, wet it with warm water and gently ring out, open up 2 layers of towel and place seed on bottom portion of towel spacing the seed so they don’t touch, fold towel back over and place is a zip lock bag but do not seal it completely tight a little air won’t hurt anything.

    Check you seed daily for the first couple of days then twice daily until you seed the little roots emerging. If towel starts to get dry moisten it with a spray bottle.

    This method is extremely helpful if you want to get a head start on the garden and the weather just isn’t cooperating. It is also a good way to check the viability of old seed.

    Photos compliments of Swallowtail Seed


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    Community Team Member wildernessny@gmail.com

    #5122914 Report Abuse
    flowerpowerz5
    flowerpowerz5
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    I do the paper towel method for morning glories and any kind of vine just before I plant them out. Pretty easy to do.


    Sandy M.

    #5122932 Report Abuse
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    Participant

    Sandy, I actually use coffee filters rather than the paper towel.  If the roots get a little bigger than they should they don’t grow into the coffee filter like they will the paper towel.  I have done beets this way in the past as well as cannelloni beans, green beans and shelling beans.

    It gives them a nice early start especially if I am running late on getting things planted in the garden.  Have a feeling this year I will be chitting a lot of seed the way the weather is going.


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    Community Team Member wildernessny@gmail.com

    #5132015 Report Abuse
    wilderness_NY_Z4
    wilderness_NY_Z4
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    Bump


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    Community Team Member wildernessny@gmail.com

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