Cardinals

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This topic contains 3 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by narnian narnian 7 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #5144312 Report Abuse

    Kcamper2003
    Participant

    I have had a red bird attacking my sliding glass door for the past 3 weeks it never stops it starts at day light and continues until dark .i put an owl in the window it worked for a day and he came right back what can I do.


    #5144318 Report Abuse
    Stelios
    Stelios
    Participant

    A warm welcome to the birding forum KC.  I have never heard of a cardinal attacking a window.  I have a resident cardinal but he is so skittish.  What I found out is that if the glass is very clear, and there are plants near the window (indoors), the birds get confused and think they can fly right through.  This happened to me a couple of weeks ago when a woodpecker flew into my picture window and died.

    I put a sun catcher made from colored cut glass.  So far so good.  What about decals.  There are so many pretty ones, even at the Dollar Store.  You might also be able to string an outdoor ornament in front of the window.  Just a few suggestions.


    Stella
    Community Team Member

    #5144322 Report Abuse
    narnian
    narnian
    Participant

    The cardinal sees his reflection in the window and is now protecting his territory from the “other” bird.

    Here is some info from Cornell’s website…

    A third type of window collision is far less likely to end in mortality, but is harmful to birds and annoying to humans witnessing it—when a bird attacks its reflection in a window. This occurs during daytime, most often in spring and early summer when birds are defending their breeding territories. The species that do this often, such as Northern Cardinals, American Robins, and California Towhees, tend to be territorial species that nest very close to buildings, and so are the ones most likely to
    notice their reflection and perceive it as a territorial rival.

    Some birds such as swallows, starlings, House Finches, and House Sparrows also nest close to buildings, but these are more colonial and far less territorial, unlikely to fight with one another, much less a reflection. Territorial battles with windows may be so strong that a bird may exhaust itself or leave you frantic, but these collisions usually don’t result in fatal injury.

    crop netting over window by Susan Spear
    Crop-netting over Lab window. Susan Spear © Cornell Lab of Ornithology
    The best solution, which will also prevent fatalities from other kinds of window collisions, is to cover the outside of the window with netting or screening so the reflection is no longer visible or the bird is held too far from it to hurt itself or be such a nuisance for you. You can also try drawing soap streaks across the window to break up the reflection.

    This territorial reaction may be so strong that the bird may exhaust itself, but it usually doesn’t result in a fatal collision.

    Here is a link if you want to read the entire article…


    #5144326 Report Abuse
    narnian
    narnian
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