Searching for Warblers in Northwest Ohio

While on a trip to do some work for the Biggest Week in American Birding, I went searching for warblers at Magee Marsh.

I’ve been in Northwest Ohio all weekend finishing up all of the final plans for the Biggest Week in American Birding that starts in just over a week. (You can find many of us from Birds & Blooms at the event!) Even though I was up there for meetings, I was still able to sneak away for a bit to search for warblers on the boardwalk at Magee Marsh. It was cold and windy this morning but a few warblers were around. My favorite species of the day was Palm Warbler. Palm Warblers are one of the earlier migrant warblers and there were several of them along the boardwalk today. This warbler species is almost as distinctive by its constant tail bobbing as it is by its plumage.

Palm Warblers can be identified by their rusty caps and yellow undertail coverts as well as their constant tail bobbing.

Palm Warblers rusty caps and yellow undertail coverts are very distinctive as is their constant tail bobbing.

This Palm Warbler approached me very closely and overall seemed unaware of my presence. I took this photo several years ago at Magee Marsh.

This Palm Warbler approached me very closely and overall seemed unaware of my presence. I took the photo several years ago at Magee Marsh.

Migration is certainly picking up! What warblers have you been seeing in your area?

  1. Jill Staake says

    Interestingly enough, I was still seeing Palm Warblers here in Tampa, FL this weekend, even though I figured they’d all be long gone by now. They’ve been a constant at my feeders all winter, and I would have expected them to all be back north by now. Glad to see at least a few of them have made it that far by now!

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