Reduce birds striking your windows


Birds can’t see glass so many fly right into our windows resulting in injury and sometimes death. A new product, from the experts at the American Bird Conservancy (ABC), has been developed from research on these window strikes that is translucent (birds can see it but light comes through), not expensive ($10.95 to $14.95 per roll), easy to use, easily removed, re-usable and can last up to 4 years!

“ABC has tested a number of different materials and patterns for their ability to deter birds from colliding with glass. The results prompted ABC to produce and make available under its own name, a new consumer product to help
concerned people prevent this significant source of bird mortality,” said ABC President George Fenwick.

ABC Bird Tape-©AmericanBirdConservancy

The ABC Bird Tape can be applied either in long strips or in pattern of 3″ squares, and American Bird Conservancy provides suggested patterns as well as detailed application instructions for both methods that will maximize protection.

http://www.abcbirdtape.org/howto.html

http://www.abcbirdtape.org/howto.html

 

Always good to know, the ABC Bird Tape is made in the United States and the packaging is from recycled paper.

 

 

How big of a problem are bird window strikes? The Cornell Lab of Ornithology states that estimates of mortality from windows, both in homes and large buildings is “up to 100 million every year  with migration being the time of largest number of collisions. The American Bird Conservancy says that many people are not aware that birds have collided with their windows: “They may have flown away injured to die elsewhere, or been eaten by a cat, raccoon, fox, or dog before you found them. Your house may kill a dozen or more birds each year without you knowing.”

 

Here is a short video that starts with some colorful birds that are at risk of collision with windows then the instructions on how to apply the ABC Bird Tape.

Think your windows are too small for a bird to try to go through it?  ABC says that smaller birds will try to fly through 4inch spaces–think about when they fly through trees and shrubs, they have to maneuver through small openings.  Here is an astonishing video that the American Bird Conservancy folks put up on their website to demonstrate how even larger birds go through small spaces. It is produce by the British Broadcasting Company, the BBC, that puts out some astonishing nature videos.

You will enjoy this video even if all your windows and door glass have screens or grills with less than 4 inch spaces and don’t need to use the tape.  They are using a Northern Goshawk which is in the same family, accipiters, as Sharp-shinned and Cooper’s Hawks.  Northern Goshawks are about 5 inches longer  and it’s wing span is 10 inches long than that of a Cooper’s Hawk.

 

  1. DEBRA CALHOUN says

    ONE YEAR WE WERE PAINTING OUR HOUSE .WE SAW TWO BLUE BIRDS ON A WIRE NEAR THE HOUSE SITTING ON A WIRE. NOTHING GOING ON WITH THEM. WELL THE NEXT MORNING THEY WERE THERE AGAING. THIS TIME THEY WERE PICKING AT THE WINDOWS. BUT FOR THE NEXT THREE DAYS THEY PICKED AT THE WINDOW. MY HUSBAND DID NOT LIKE THIS. WE WHERE ABLE TO SCARED THEM AWAY.I WAS ABLE TO GET SOME PICTURE OF THEM A THE WINDOW.

    • says

      Debra-the bluebirds at your windows may have been seeing their image. Here is what Cornell Lab of Ornithology says: “Bluebirds, especially males, are very territorial during the breeding season, vigorously defending their territory from other bluebirds. When pecking at the window a bluebird may not realize he is attacking his own reflection, not a bluebird encroaching on his territory. The territorial response may be so strong the bird will attack his reflection without stopping to feed. This behavior should only last through the nesting cycle, and is preventable during this period. ”

      If it should happen again, instead of trying to scare the bluebirds away, you can use the ABC Bird Tape to break up the reflection or you can soap up the window for awhile to stop the reflection until the bluebirds move on naturally.

  2. Theresa Mears says

    We have a bluebird that loves the chrome bumper on our pickup truck. Flits around on it, then hops down to the concrete, then back up on the bumper. And so on.

    • says

      Hi Theresa, I suspect your bluebird may well be seeing it’s image in the chrome bumper just as happened to Debra with the bluebirds above with her windows. It would be interesting to know the times of year when your bluebird does that as it most likely correlates with nesting season in your area. Thanks for sharing

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