Binoculars for Beginners

Beginning birder kit from Eagle Optics

I never considered myself a “beginner” when it comes to birding. After all, I can name pretty much name every backyard bird in America. But then I went to the Biggest Week in American Birding back in May, and I got my first real experience of being out in the field. I realized that field birding is a lot different than backyard birding. And I also realized that having binoculars is a must! (It’s also a must to refer to binoculars in cool bird talk…bins or binocs.)

So I started researching and quickly realized how expensive bins are. With my budget of $200 or less (which is like nothing in binoc world), I scoured reviews, bugged my birding friends and ever requested help here on the blog.

My son, shocked at the amazing view through the bins.

I finally settled on an Eagle Optics Denali pair. Even better, I discovered the Denalis were in a beginning birder kit they have available online. They came with a field guide and a membership to the American Birding Association. Score!

There are other great binocs out there, but I just wanted to report that I love my Denalis, and they really are perfect for this “beginner.” I use them to see things both near and far, and I can’t wait to get out in the field with them.

By the way, my son got to try these out briefly. Rest assured, my $200 bins stay of of the reach of children.

 

  1. Vicki says

    Great pic of Jack. Maybe we can find some really good birds up north in a couple of weeks. Will you finally see the pileated woodpecker?

  2. Bob 501 says

    thanks for the advice it helps when others help with research… my grandkids 3 and 4 have their own binocs… sometimes looking backwards but they know the common mt. birds already.

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