Baltimore Oriole

This stunning bird is very similar in appearance to its western cousin, the Bullock’s Oriole. At one time, both species were considered one species, the northern oriole. Their ranges overlap in the middle of the country.

Baltimore Oriole

Roland Jordahl Baltimore Oriole, male

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula
Family: Blackbird.
Length: 8 inches.
Wingspan: 11-1/2 inches.
Distinctive Markings: Male has a full black hood and fire-orange plumage. Female is drab yellow with dusky-brown wings.
Nest: Woven bag-like structure on a tree branch; holds three to seven bluish or grayish speckled eggs.
Voice: Short series of clear whistles in varied pattern.
Habitat: Deciduous woodlands, parks and suburbs.
Diet: Mostly insects and berries.
Backyard Favorites: Sugar water, oranges and grape jelly.

Listen to the Baltimore Oriole’s song and learn where to spot them!

Bird songs provided by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Baltimore Oriole Bird SpeciesRange maps provided by Kaufman Field Guides, the official field guide of Birds & Blooms.

Photos

Information

Baltimore Oriole

Roland Jordahl Baltimore Oriole, male

Scientific Name: Icterus galbula
Family: Blackbird.
Length: 8 inches.
Wingspan: 11-1/2 inches.
Distinctive Markings: Male has a full black hood and fire-orange plumage. Female is drab yellow with dusky-brown wings.
Nest: Woven bag-like structure on a tree branch; holds three to seven bluish or grayish speckled eggs.
Voice: Short series of clear whistles in varied pattern.
Habitat: Deciduous woodlands, parks and suburbs.
Diet: Mostly insects and berries.
Backyard Favorites: Sugar water, oranges and grape jelly.

Bird Song & Range Map

Listen to the Baltimore Oriole’s song and learn where to spot them!

Bird songs provided by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Baltimore Oriole Bird SpeciesRange maps provided by Kaufman Field Guides, the official field guide of Birds & Blooms.

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  1. says

    I had the wonderful experience of enjoying what I believe to be the Baltimore Oriole. I live in the four corners area called Dolores, Co. I am not on the map where the Orioles summer. They were about three couples of Orioles three beautiful males and three females. They were feeding on the hummingbird feeders so I bought an Oriole feeder. I am not sure what happened but soon the males disappeared and the females remained for a few weeks and now are gone also. I hope they return next summer as I enjoyed them so much. Does anyone know if this is their normal pattern for migration?

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